Adolescent Literacy
Paper instructions:
(1) Initially, observe the class as a whole. Focus on the literacy behaviors you see and interpret their general impact on the learning taking place in the classroom. Consider how fluency, vocabulary skills, and comprehension strategies are emphasized in the learning process, how the differences in interacting with expository and narrative text impacts understanding, whether literature is used to motivate, and whether you see evidence of critical literacy (higher order thinking skills) at play in the classroom.
(2) Select one student to observe more closely. Look at the student’s written work, listen to the student specifically in discussions, talk to the student about how reading and literacy are incorporated in the student’s life, etc.
(3) Create a class/student profile of 1250-1500 words that describes both the class (first) and your selected student (second) in terms of literacy traits. Address the considerations listed above and interpret what you saw as it relates to the overall literacy and learning process.

The class and the students can be what you would expect and you do not need to observe a class or student in person just write about it.

(1) Construct a Venn diagram that illustrates the literacy skills the student demonstrated at the onset of the lessons (into), those that intersected (through), and those that are left to master (beyond). The time you spend with the student should facilitate this process through an investigation of the student’s prior knowledge and literacy experiences (into), a best practice activity to stimulate literacy growth (through), and an assessment of what future literacy goals should be set. As you work with your student, consider, on an individual level, how fluency, vocabulary skills, and comprehension skills impact learning, how the differences in interacting with expository and narrative text impacts this student’s understanding, whether literature motivates this student, and whether you see evidence of critical literacy in your student’s approach to text.

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Adolescent Literacy
Paper instructions:
(1) Initially, observe the class as a whole. Focus on the literacy behaviors you see and interpret their general impact on the learning taking place in the classroom. Consider how fluency, vocabulary skills, and comprehension strategies are emphasized in the learning process, how the differences in interacting with expository and narrative text impacts understanding, whether literature is used to motivate, and whether you see evidence of critical literacy (higher order thinking skills) at play in the classroom.
(2) Select one student to observe more closely. Look at the student’s written work, listen to the student specifically in discussions, talk to the student about how reading and literacy are incorporated in the student’s life, etc.
(3) Create a class/student profile of 1250-1500 words that describes both the class (first) and your selected student (second) in terms of literacy traits. Address the considerations listed above and interpret what you saw as it relates to the overall literacy and learning process.

The class and the students can be what you would expect and you do not need to observe a class or student in person just write about it.

(1) Construct a Venn diagram that illustrates the literacy skills the student demonstrated at the onset of the lessons (into), those that intersected (through), and those that are left to master (beyond). The time you spend with the student should facilitate this process through an investigation of the student’s prior knowledge and literacy experiences (into), a best practice activity to stimulate literacy growth (through), and an assessment of what future literacy goals should be set. As you work with your student, consider, on an individual level, how fluency, vocabulary skills, and comprehension skills impact learning, how the differences in interacting with expository and narrative text impacts this student’s understanding, whether literature motivates this student, and whether you see evidence of critical literacy in your student’s approach to text.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *