BHR 4350, Collective Bargaining 1 Course Learning Outcomes for Unit III Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to: 2. Apply union organizing strategies to various scenarios. Reading Assignment Chapter 4: Establishing a Bargaining Unit and the Organizing Campaign Unit Lesson The first two units of this course provided an overview of labor relations. Labor relations was defined, along with different laws. The differences between private and public sector labor relations have also been discussed. This unit focuses on the process by which a group of employees can organize for the purpose of collective bargaining and be recognized by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) as a bargaining unit. Wow, what does this mean? There are several sources available where you can find an appropriate definition of collective bargaining. Other than the description provided within our textbook, the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) provides a good definition: Collective bargaining is a process in which working people, through their unions, negotiate contracts with employers to determine their terms of employment, including pay, health care, pensions and other benefits, hours, leave, job health and safety policies, ways to balance work and family and more. Employees jointly decide their priorities for bargaining. Union employees choose who will speak for them in bargaining sessions with the employer, and vote to accept or reject the contract reached by the employer and employee bargaining committees. A ratified contract legally binds both sides— management and workers—to the contract terms. (Para. 1) When it comes to labor relations, bargaining is very important. Bargaining can be considered one of the most important aspects between the employer and the employee. This can be referred to as the heart of the relationship between both parties. With this being said, the bargaining process is not as simple as many people think. Most employees think bargaining is just a matter of employees getting together to go see management about employee work relations concerns. This is not an accurate picture of bargaining. In order for bargaining to take place, there must be a union in place to represent/support the employees. Although employees have the right to organize and to seek representation under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), subsequent court, and National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) decisions define the processed for representation (Carrell & Heavrin, 2013). Along with the bargaining determination, the NLRB must determine the group of employees that are considered to be an appropriate bargaining unit. Once this is done, the employees can make a decision about representation. Most of the time the employees will decide to utilize a labor union. Organizing begins once the employees have been contacted by the union representative, extending an invitation for them to sign an authorization card. More than 50% of the employees must sign the card in order for the union to request for the employer to recognize the union. Although this seems to be easy to accomplish, it is not always an easy process. Often times, employees are afraid, not knowing what to expect if they do sign the card and the employer finds out. Therefore, if the employees refuse to sign or if 30-50% of the employees sign the authorization cards, then the NLRB will conduct a secret-ballot election. If the union wins by majority vote, then the NLRB will certify the union; however, if the union does not win by majority vote the NLRB may request a UNIT III STUDY GUIDE Bargaining and Union Formation BHR 4350, Collective Bargaining 2 UNIT x STUDY GUIDE Title new election. New elections are generally requested when the NLRB has determined the election was not conducted fairly. Other factors that must be considered when establishing bargaining rights include: types of units to be covered, the union structure, and organizing strategies. Not all professions are covered under collective bargaining. In Chapter 4 of the textbook, the different types of units are discussed in detail. Each unit is further broken down for the reader to understand how they are different and what establishes the rights to bargain. Most supervisor and management positions do not fall under collective bargaining. From the employers’ standpoint, union avoidance is a big concern. Many organizations try to keep unions out as much as possible. Management does try to convince the employees to vote against the union; however, they must follow regulations during this campaign. Management must be careful not to make the employee feel threatened or that their rights have been violated if they decide to join the union. From experience, many organizations try to provide decent wages, benefits, and working conditions. These are some of the major concerns of employees that may lead to unionization. As you can see, the initial approval for unionization and bargaining is not as simple as some would imagine. Based on the reading in Chapter 4 and within this unit, you should have a better understanding of the following processes:  bargaining unit determination (even in the public sector),  identifying and explaining union structure,  organizing drive and union organizing strategies,  what organizations do in efforts to a avoid unions (the strategies used by management), and  the full representation election process. References Carrell, M. R. & Heavrin, C. (2013). Labor relations and collective bargaining: Private and public sectors (10th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. (2015). Collective bargaining. Retrieved from http://www.aflcio.org/Learn-About-Unions/Collective-Bargaining Suggested Reading This article will provide students with the opportunity to see a case based on the NLRB overriding a decision in regards to union organization within a company. In order to access the resource below, you must first log into the myCSU Student Portal and access the ABI/INFORM Complete database within the CSU Online Library. Donovan, Kevin C. (2012). NLRB overrules Dana, boosting union organizing via card counts. Employee Relations Law Journal, 37(4): 67-70.

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BHR 4350, Collective Bargaining 1 Course Learning Outcomes for Unit III Upon completion of this unit, students should be able to: 2. Apply union organizing strategies to various scenarios. Reading Assignment Chapter 4: Establishing a Bargaining Unit and the Organizing Campaign Unit Lesson The first two units of this course provided an overview of labor relations. Labor relations was defined, along with different laws. The differences between private and public sector labor relations have also been discussed. This unit focuses on the process by which a group of employees can organize for the purpose of collective bargaining and be recognized by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) as a bargaining unit. Wow, what does this mean? There are several sources available where you can find an appropriate definition of collective bargaining. Other than the description provided within our textbook, the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) provides a good definition: Collective bargaining is a process in which working people, through their unions, negotiate contracts with employers to determine their terms of employment, including pay, health care, pensions and other benefits, hours, leave, job health and safety policies, ways to balance work and family and more. Employees jointly decide their priorities for bargaining. Union employees choose who will speak for them in bargaining sessions with the employer, and vote to accept or reject the contract reached by the employer and employee bargaining committees. A ratified contract legally binds both sides— management and workers—to the contract terms. (Para. 1) When it comes to labor relations, bargaining is very important. Bargaining can be considered one of the most important aspects between the employer and the employee. This can be referred to as the heart of the relationship between both parties. With this being said, the bargaining process is not as simple as many people think. Most employees think bargaining is just a matter of employees getting together to go see management about employee work relations concerns. This is not an accurate picture of bargaining. In order for bargaining to take place, there must be a union in place to represent/support the employees. Although employees have the right to organize and to seek representation under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), subsequent court, and National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) decisions define the processed for representation (Carrell & Heavrin, 2013). Along with the bargaining determination, the NLRB must determine the group of employees that are considered to be an appropriate bargaining unit. Once this is done, the employees can make a decision about representation. Most of the time the employees will decide to utilize a labor union. Organizing begins once the employees have been contacted by the union representative, extending an invitation for them to sign an authorization card. More than 50% of the employees must sign the card in order for the union to request for the employer to recognize the union. Although this seems to be easy to accomplish, it is not always an easy process. Often times, employees are afraid, not knowing what to expect if they do sign the card and the employer finds out. Therefore, if the employees refuse to sign or if 30-50% of the employees sign the authorization cards, then the NLRB will conduct a secret-ballot election. If the union wins by majority vote, then the NLRB will certify the union; however, if the union does not win by majority vote the NLRB may request a UNIT III STUDY GUIDE Bargaining and Union Formation BHR 4350, Collective Bargaining 2 UNIT x STUDY GUIDE Title new election. New elections are generally requested when the NLRB has determined the election was not conducted fairly. Other factors that must be considered when establishing bargaining rights include: types of units to be covered, the union structure, and organizing strategies. Not all professions are covered under collective bargaining. In Chapter 4 of the textbook, the different types of units are discussed in detail. Each unit is further broken down for the reader to understand how they are different and what establishes the rights to bargain. Most supervisor and management positions do not fall under collective bargaining. From the employers’ standpoint, union avoidance is a big concern. Many organizations try to keep unions out as much as possible. Management does try to convince the employees to vote against the union; however, they must follow regulations during this campaign. Management must be careful not to make the employee feel threatened or that their rights have been violated if they decide to join the union. From experience, many organizations try to provide decent wages, benefits, and working conditions. These are some of the major concerns of employees that may lead to unionization. As you can see, the initial approval for unionization and bargaining is not as simple as some would imagine. Based on the reading in Chapter 4 and within this unit, you should have a better understanding of the following processes:  bargaining unit determination (even in the public sector),  identifying and explaining union structure,  organizing drive and union organizing strategies,  what organizations do in efforts to a avoid unions (the strategies used by management), and  the full representation election process. References Carrell, M. R. & Heavrin, C. (2013). Labor relations and collective bargaining: Private and public sectors (10th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall. The American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. (2015). Collective bargaining. Retrieved from http://www.aflcio.org/Learn-About-Unions/Collective-Bargaining Suggested Reading This article will provide students with the opportunity to see a case based on the NLRB overriding a decision in regards to union organization within a company. In order to access the resource below, you must first log into the myCSU Student Portal and access the ABI/INFORM Complete database within the CSU Online Library. Donovan, Kevin C. (2012). NLRB overrules Dana, boosting union organizing via card counts. Employee Relations Law Journal, 37(4): 67-70.

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