CHAPTER 3: ANALYSIS (APPROXIMATELY 9-12 PAGES)

This is the “meat” of the paper in which you analyze your primary sources as evidence in support of your argument. Your primary sources constitute your primary object of study (television episodes, industry documents, web sites, social media messages, articles from the trade and popular press, etc.)

 

  • After reviewing, rescreening, and taking notes on your primary sources, organize your analysis into coherent subsections.
  • TIP: Identify a source you have found in your own research that is closest to what you want to do in your thesis and use it as a model for structuring your analysis.
  • In each subsection, provide a textual analysis of evidence from your primary sources to support your argument.
  • Use the PEAR structure discussed in class write each body paragraph to ensure that it is supporting your argument.
  • Be sure to select your evidence and analyze it carefully. Don’t try to analyze every part of your primary sources and avoid plot summary. To help do this, ask “why” and “how” of the texts and not “what.”
  • Be sure to cite each source carefully and correctly.

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CHAPTER 3: ANALYSIS (APPROXIMATELY 9-12 PAGES)

This is the “meat” of the paper in which you analyze your primary sources as evidence in support of your argument. Your primary sources constitute your primary object of study (television episodes, industry documents, web sites, social media messages, articles from the trade and popular press, etc.)

 

  • After reviewing, rescreening, and taking notes on your primary sources, organize your analysis into coherent subsections.
  • TIP: Identify a source you have found in your own research that is closest to what you want to do in your thesis and use it as a model for structuring your analysis.
  • In each subsection, provide a textual analysis of evidence from your primary sources to support your argument.
  • Use the PEAR structure discussed in class write each body paragraph to ensure that it is supporting your argument.
  • Be sure to select your evidence and analyze it carefully. Don’t try to analyze every part of your primary sources and avoid plot summary. To help do this, ask “why” and “how” of the texts and not “what.”
  • Be sure to cite each source carefully and correctly.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *