Documentation essay: rule consequences for 4 person

Paper details:

Mohammed Ali (anti-war),Theodore Kaczynski,Rosa Parks (acts of courage),Liu Xiaobo. please use all the source that had in word file.total 12 source

Mohammed Ali (anti-war)
Article#1:
“Muhammad Ali Biography •”. Biography Online. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: An Olympic and World Champion boxer, who also had a unique personality
Rule: Ali failed the Armed Forces qualifying test because his writing and spelling skills were subpar. However, in early 1966, the tests were revised and Ali was reclassified 1A. He refused to serve in the United States Army during the Vietnam War as a conscientious objector, because “War is against the teachings of the Holy Koran
Consequence: Vietnam puts a pause in Ali’s career
Article#2:
“Muhammad Ali, Boxing Legend And Anti-War Icon, Dies At 74”. The Huffington Post. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.

Biography: Muhammad Ali, who was renowned as much for his wit and principles as his fighting prowess, died Friday night at age 74, a family spokesman said.
Rule: In 1966, Ali refused induction into the military as the Vietnam War raged, saying he was a conscientious objector protected by his religious beliefs.
Consequence: While critics called him a draft dodger, Ali stood his ground, risking prison time and winnings.
Article#3:
Gay, Jason. “Muhammad Ali Shook Up the World; the Legendary Boxer Called Himself ‘the Greatest,’ which was both a Garish Boast and the Flat Truth.” Wall Street Journal (Online)Jun 04 2016. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: In the chaos following his first career-making triumph over Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, Muhammad Ali–still then a 22-year-old from Louisville, Ky., named Cassius Clay–found his way to a microphone and camera in the crowded boxing ring and bellowed five words that announced his loud arrival:
“I shook up the world!”
The final decades of Ali’s life would be less confrontational than the earlier ones. Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1984 at age 42, which would cause tremors in his limbs and eventually still his expressive face. Ali would continue to make public appearances, no longer a whirlwind of contentiousness but a beloved legend, most memorably at the 1996 Olympics, when the 1960 gold medalist appeared at the Opening Ceremony in Atlanta and lit the flame. Though Ali’s voice was diminished, his sense of humor remained intact–there was the hilarious “60 Minutes” episode in which a prankster Ali pretended to fall asleep and throw drowsy punches at correspondent Ed Bradley.
Theodore Kaczynski
Article#1:
Ablow, Dr. “Was The Unabomber Correct? | Fox News”. Fox News. N.p., 2013. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: Ted Kaczynski, aka the Unabomber, was rightly imprisoned for life in 1998 for sending bombs that maimed and killed three people and injured 23 more, from 1978 to 1992. No one can excuse his terrorism.
Rule: Kaczynski’s ideas, however, described in a manifesto entitled, “Industrial Society and Its Future,” cannot be dismissed, and are increasingly important as our society hurtles toward individual disempowerment at the hands of technology and political forces that erode autonomy.
Consequence: Kaczynski, while reprehensible for murdering and maiming people, was precisely correct in many of his ideas.
Article#2:
Chase, Alston. “Harvard And The Making Of The Unabomber”. The Atlantic. N.p., 2000. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: In the fall of 1958 Theodore Kaczynski, a brilliant but vulnerable boy of sixteen, entered Harvard College. There he encountered a prevailing intellectual atmosphere of anti-technological despair. There, also, he was deceived into subjecting himself to a series of purposely brutalizing psychological experiments
Rule: Ted Kaczynski. According to the conventional wisdom, Kaczynski, a brilliant former professor of mathematics turned Montana hermit and mail bomber, is, simply, mentally ill. He is a paranoid schizophrenic, and there is nothing more about him to interest us. But the conventional wisdom is mistaken.
Article#3:
“FBI 100 – The Unabomber”. FBI. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: The man that the world would eventually know as Theodore Kaczynski came to our attention in 1978 with the explosion of his first, primitive homemade bomb at a Chicago university.
Rule: The Unabomber sent us a 35,000 word essay claiming to explain his motives and views of the ills of modern society.
Consequence: his guilty plea in January 1998: an isolated cell in a “Supermax” prison in Colorado.
Rosa Parks (acts of courage)
Article#1: Boycott, Rosa. “Rosa Parks – Black History – HISTORY.Com”. HISTORY.com. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: Rosa Parks (1913—2005) helped initiate the civil rights movement in the United States.
Rule: The leaders of the local black community organized a bus boycott that began the day Parks was convicted of violating the segregation laws.
Consequence: the drama in Montgomery continued to gain attention from the national and international press. On November 13, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that bus segregation was unconstitutional; the boycott ended December 20, a day after the Court’s written order arrived in Montgomery. Parks—who had lost her job and experienced harassment all year—became known as “the mother of the civil rights movement.”
Article#2: Sue Anne Pressley and,Petula Dvorak. “Thousands Honor Courage of Rosa Parks; A Gathering of Gratitude for Movement’s Inspiration.” The Washington PostOct 31 2005. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: humble woman whose courageous act 50 years ago led to the breakdown of racial segregation in the United States.
Rule: A massive crowd of people of all ages, colors and political beliefs pressed together, then lined up patiently at the U.S. Capitol to view her coffin and talk about the enormous changes she brought the nation – – and them.
Consequence: She became the first woman.

Article#3:
“Rosa Parks.” The Washington PostOct 26 2005. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: Rosa Parks’s individual act of courage and determination on Dec. 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Ala
Rule: Mrs. Parks didn’t have such far-reaching goals in mind when she decided not to give up her bus seat to a white man on that December evening 50 years ago.
Consequence: ltimately changed a way of life, moving the nation closer to fulfilling America’s founding principles, rooted in equality, liberty and the intrinsic value of every person.

Liu Xiaobo

Article#1: “Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Peace Prize.” Wall Street Journal (Online)Oct 08 2010. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Liu Xiaobo, a jailed Chinese dissident
Rule:In a move that infuriated China and threatened to heighten tensions with the West by re-focusing international attention on Beijing’s human rights record.
Consequence: Mr. Liu’s prize could embolden China’s critics overseas while breathing new life into its fragmented democracy movement.
Article#2:
Ford, Peter. “China Harasses Family of Nobel Peace Laureate Liu Xiaobo.” The Christian Science Monitor: 7. Apr 23 2013. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo’s brother-in-law went on trial for fraud Tuesday, the latest in a string of Chinese dissidents’ relatives to be subjected to official harassment and persecution.
Rule: “Persecuting relatives is part of the arsenal deployed against dissidents, critics and whistleblowers as a matter of routine” in China, says Nicholas Bequelin, a researcher for Human Rights Watch in Hong Kong. “It is very much part of the repertoire of political repression.”

Consequence: Liu himself is currently serving an 11-year jail sentence for inciting subversion after helping organize a pro-democracy campaign called “Charter ’08.” Now his brother-in-law, Liu Hui, faces 14 years imprisonment. The three-hour hearing in a suburban Beijing court ended without a verdict.
Article#3: Havel, Vaclav, and Desmond M. Tutu. “China’s Moment of Truth; Freeing Liu Xiaobo would be a Sign of Strength.” The Washington PostOct 22 2010. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: writer Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Rule: At its core, Charter 08 asks the Chinese government to honor rights enshrined in the Chinese Constitution. The government has already signed the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and ratified the International Covenant on Economic and Social Rights. In a recent interview with CNN, premier Wen Jiabao acknowledged that “Freedom of speech is indispensable. . . . The people’s wishes for, and needs for, democracy and freedom are irresistible.”
Consequence: Today, more than at any other time in history, the world looks to China as a leader. China has a chance to show that it is a forward-looking nation, as it has been for thousands of years. If it keeps Liu behind bars, the Chinese government is no more progressive than the ever paranoid and closeted Burmese junta, the only other regime with the gall to lock away another recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Aung San Suu Kyi. Release Liu, and China continues its impressive emergence on the world stage. Beijing helped keep the global economy afloat amid recent crisis; now it can show the world that it has the confidence to face criticism and embrace change.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Documentation essay: rule consequences for 4 person

Paper details:

Mohammed Ali (anti-war),Theodore Kaczynski,Rosa Parks (acts of courage),Liu Xiaobo. please use all the source that had in word file.total 12 source

Mohammed Ali (anti-war)
Article#1:
“Muhammad Ali Biography •”. Biography Online. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: An Olympic and World Champion boxer, who also had a unique personality
Rule: Ali failed the Armed Forces qualifying test because his writing and spelling skills were subpar. However, in early 1966, the tests were revised and Ali was reclassified 1A. He refused to serve in the United States Army during the Vietnam War as a conscientious objector, because “War is against the teachings of the Holy Koran
Consequence: Vietnam puts a pause in Ali’s career
Article#2:
“Muhammad Ali, Boxing Legend And Anti-War Icon, Dies At 74”. The Huffington Post. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.

Biography: Muhammad Ali, who was renowned as much for his wit and principles as his fighting prowess, died Friday night at age 74, a family spokesman said.
Rule: In 1966, Ali refused induction into the military as the Vietnam War raged, saying he was a conscientious objector protected by his religious beliefs.
Consequence: While critics called him a draft dodger, Ali stood his ground, risking prison time and winnings.
Article#3:
Gay, Jason. “Muhammad Ali Shook Up the World; the Legendary Boxer Called Himself ‘the Greatest,’ which was both a Garish Boast and the Flat Truth.” Wall Street Journal (Online)Jun 04 2016. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: In the chaos following his first career-making triumph over Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, Muhammad Ali–still then a 22-year-old from Louisville, Ky., named Cassius Clay–found his way to a microphone and camera in the crowded boxing ring and bellowed five words that announced his loud arrival:
“I shook up the world!”
The final decades of Ali’s life would be less confrontational than the earlier ones. Ali was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 1984 at age 42, which would cause tremors in his limbs and eventually still his expressive face. Ali would continue to make public appearances, no longer a whirlwind of contentiousness but a beloved legend, most memorably at the 1996 Olympics, when the 1960 gold medalist appeared at the Opening Ceremony in Atlanta and lit the flame. Though Ali’s voice was diminished, his sense of humor remained intact–there was the hilarious “60 Minutes” episode in which a prankster Ali pretended to fall asleep and throw drowsy punches at correspondent Ed Bradley.
Theodore Kaczynski
Article#1:
Ablow, Dr. “Was The Unabomber Correct? | Fox News”. Fox News. N.p., 2013. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: Ted Kaczynski, aka the Unabomber, was rightly imprisoned for life in 1998 for sending bombs that maimed and killed three people and injured 23 more, from 1978 to 1992. No one can excuse his terrorism.
Rule: Kaczynski’s ideas, however, described in a manifesto entitled, “Industrial Society and Its Future,” cannot be dismissed, and are increasingly important as our society hurtles toward individual disempowerment at the hands of technology and political forces that erode autonomy.
Consequence: Kaczynski, while reprehensible for murdering and maiming people, was precisely correct in many of his ideas.
Article#2:
Chase, Alston. “Harvard And The Making Of The Unabomber”. The Atlantic. N.p., 2000. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: In the fall of 1958 Theodore Kaczynski, a brilliant but vulnerable boy of sixteen, entered Harvard College. There he encountered a prevailing intellectual atmosphere of anti-technological despair. There, also, he was deceived into subjecting himself to a series of purposely brutalizing psychological experiments
Rule: Ted Kaczynski. According to the conventional wisdom, Kaczynski, a brilliant former professor of mathematics turned Montana hermit and mail bomber, is, simply, mentally ill. He is a paranoid schizophrenic, and there is nothing more about him to interest us. But the conventional wisdom is mistaken.
Article#3:
“FBI 100 – The Unabomber”. FBI. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: The man that the world would eventually know as Theodore Kaczynski came to our attention in 1978 with the explosion of his first, primitive homemade bomb at a Chicago university.
Rule: The Unabomber sent us a 35,000 word essay claiming to explain his motives and views of the ills of modern society.
Consequence: his guilty plea in January 1998: an isolated cell in a “Supermax” prison in Colorado.
Rosa Parks (acts of courage)
Article#1: Boycott, Rosa. “Rosa Parks – Black History – HISTORY.Com”. HISTORY.com. N.p., 2016. Web. 13 June 2016.
Biography: Rosa Parks (1913—2005) helped initiate the civil rights movement in the United States.
Rule: The leaders of the local black community organized a bus boycott that began the day Parks was convicted of violating the segregation laws.
Consequence: the drama in Montgomery continued to gain attention from the national and international press. On November 13, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that bus segregation was unconstitutional; the boycott ended December 20, a day after the Court’s written order arrived in Montgomery. Parks—who had lost her job and experienced harassment all year—became known as “the mother of the civil rights movement.”
Article#2: Sue Anne Pressley and,Petula Dvorak. “Thousands Honor Courage of Rosa Parks; A Gathering of Gratitude for Movement’s Inspiration.” The Washington PostOct 31 2005. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: humble woman whose courageous act 50 years ago led to the breakdown of racial segregation in the United States.
Rule: A massive crowd of people of all ages, colors and political beliefs pressed together, then lined up patiently at the U.S. Capitol to view her coffin and talk about the enormous changes she brought the nation – – and them.
Consequence: She became the first woman.

Article#3:
“Rosa Parks.” The Washington PostOct 26 2005. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: Rosa Parks’s individual act of courage and determination on Dec. 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Ala
Rule: Mrs. Parks didn’t have such far-reaching goals in mind when she decided not to give up her bus seat to a white man on that December evening 50 years ago.
Consequence: ltimately changed a way of life, moving the nation closer to fulfilling America’s founding principles, rooted in equality, liberty and the intrinsic value of every person.

Liu Xiaobo

Article#1: “Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Peace Prize.” Wall Street Journal (Online)Oct 08 2010. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: The 2010 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Liu Xiaobo, a jailed Chinese dissident
Rule:In a move that infuriated China and threatened to heighten tensions with the West by re-focusing international attention on Beijing’s human rights record.
Consequence: Mr. Liu’s prize could embolden China’s critics overseas while breathing new life into its fragmented democracy movement.
Article#2:
Ford, Peter. “China Harasses Family of Nobel Peace Laureate Liu Xiaobo.” The Christian Science Monitor: 7. Apr 23 2013. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo’s brother-in-law went on trial for fraud Tuesday, the latest in a string of Chinese dissidents’ relatives to be subjected to official harassment and persecution.
Rule: “Persecuting relatives is part of the arsenal deployed against dissidents, critics and whistleblowers as a matter of routine” in China, says Nicholas Bequelin, a researcher for Human Rights Watch in Hong Kong. “It is very much part of the repertoire of political repression.”

Consequence: Liu himself is currently serving an 11-year jail sentence for inciting subversion after helping organize a pro-democracy campaign called “Charter ’08.” Now his brother-in-law, Liu Hui, faces 14 years imprisonment. The three-hour hearing in a suburban Beijing court ended without a verdict.
Article#3: Havel, Vaclav, and Desmond M. Tutu. “China’s Moment of Truth; Freeing Liu Xiaobo would be a Sign of Strength.” The Washington PostOct 22 2010. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016 .
Biography: writer Liu Xiaobo was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Rule: At its core, Charter 08 asks the Chinese government to honor rights enshrined in the Chinese Constitution. The government has already signed the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and ratified the International Covenant on Economic and Social Rights. In a recent interview with CNN, premier Wen Jiabao acknowledged that “Freedom of speech is indispensable. . . . The people’s wishes for, and needs for, democracy and freedom are irresistible.”
Consequence: Today, more than at any other time in history, the world looks to China as a leader. China has a chance to show that it is a forward-looking nation, as it has been for thousands of years. If it keeps Liu behind bars, the Chinese government is no more progressive than the ever paranoid and closeted Burmese junta, the only other regime with the gall to lock away another recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Aung San Suu Kyi. Release Liu, and China continues its impressive emergence on the world stage. Beijing helped keep the global economy afloat amid recent crisis; now it can show the world that it has the confidence to face criticism and embrace change.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *