DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY? (No)

this is a debate.
I need 6 minute intro based on the question: DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY? (No)
__________________
Part of the debate include a small written essay. please divide the 275 words for the introduction and cited in order to put it in the written part. You can divide the 275 into two parts : a written part cited and the speech part. This question plays in canada and should be according to canada’s government etc.

Below I have found some information that may help or contribute please take a look and do cite.
thanks
Stone, Steven J., and Emil J. Dzuray. “Achieving Environmental Sustainability in Government Operations.” Public Manager 34.4 (2006): 22-6. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016.

https://www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/default.asp?lang=En&n=892FBDA6-1 – Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada 2013–2016
——————-
Intro:
In the 21st century, the world faces tremendous challenges, including economic crises, global warming, air pollution, poverty, poor health, and loss of biodiversity. For more than two decades, sustainable development has been advanced as a means of reconciling human development with the earth’s ecological systems. The journey toward truly sustainable development and decision-making has become a key goal of public policy in Canada and around the world. Development that is not sustainable will inevitably lead to negative economic, environmental, and social repercussions. Advancing sustainable development is about safeguarding our future and improving the quality of life in Canada and for the global community.
Environmental decision-making in Canada takes place in a complex array of jurisdictions, with multiple social and economic priorities, differing stakeholder interests, complex scientific knowledge, international considerations, and priorities of Canadians.
Canada is a country of vast distances and a dispersed population, an economy driven by production and export of natural resources, a northern climate, and of high population growth. The Canadian economy is highly dependent on the health and sustainability of our natural resource industries (renewable and non-renewable), and the reliability of our critical infrastructure, including transportation and health care systems.
——————-
The role of government in building the sustainable economy includes:
Funding basic science needed for renewable energy and renewable resource technology.
Using the tax system, government purchasing power and other financial tools to steer private capital toward investment in renewable energy and other sustainability technologies and businesses.
Investment in sustainability infrastructure, such as smart grids, electric vehicle charging stations, mass transit, waste management facilities, water filtration systems and sewage treatment systems.
Regulating land use and other private behaviors to minimize destruction of ecosystems.
Working with private organizations as well as state and local government to ensure that the transition is well-managed in the real world.
Measuring our society’s progress toward sustainability by developing and maintaining a system of generally accepted sustainability metrics. This in turn should facilitate the integration of sustainability into our overall management of the economy along with the setting of national sustainable economic policy.
Transferring sustainability technologies to the developing world.

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DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY? (No)

this is a debate.
I need 6 minute intro based on the question: DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY? (No)
__________________
Part of the debate include a small written essay. please divide the 275 words for the introduction and cited in order to put it in the written part. You can divide the 275 into two parts : a written part cited and the speech part. This question plays in canada and should be according to canada’s government etc.

Below I have found some information that may help or contribute please take a look and do cite.
thanks
Stone, Steven J., and Emil J. Dzuray. “Achieving Environmental Sustainability in Government Operations.” Public Manager 34.4 (2006): 22-6. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016.

https://www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/default.asp?lang=En&n=892FBDA6-1 – Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada 2013–2016
——————-
Intro:
In the 21st century, the world faces tremendous challenges, including economic crises, global warming, air pollution, poverty, poor health, and loss of biodiversity. For more than two decades, sustainable development has been advanced as a means of reconciling human development with the earth’s ecological systems. The journey toward truly sustainable development and decision-making has become a key goal of public policy in Canada and around the world. Development that is not sustainable will inevitably lead to negative economic, environmental, and social repercussions. Advancing sustainable development is about safeguarding our future and improving the quality of life in Canada and for the global community.
Environmental decision-making in Canada takes place in a complex array of jurisdictions, with multiple social and economic priorities, differing stakeholder interests, complex scientific knowledge, international considerations, and priorities of Canadians.
Canada is a country of vast distances and a dispersed population, an economy driven by production and export of natural resources, a northern climate, and of high population growth. The Canadian economy is highly dependent on the health and sustainability of our natural resource industries (renewable and non-renewable), and the reliability of our critical infrastructure, including transportation and health care systems.
——————-
The role of government in building the sustainable economy includes:
Funding basic science needed for renewable energy and renewable resource technology.
Using the tax system, government purchasing power and other financial tools to steer private capital toward investment in renewable energy and other sustainability technologies and businesses.
Investment in sustainability infrastructure, such as smart grids, electric vehicle charging stations, mass transit, waste management facilities, water filtration systems and sewage treatment systems.
Regulating land use and other private behaviors to minimize destruction of ecosystems.
Working with private organizations as well as state and local government to ensure that the transition is well-managed in the real world.
Measuring our society’s progress toward sustainability by developing and maintaining a system of generally accepted sustainability metrics. This in turn should facilitate the integration of sustainability into our overall management of the economy along with the setting of national sustainable economic policy.
Transferring sustainability technologies to the developing world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY (No)

this is a debate.
I need 6 minute intro based on the question: DOES THE FREE MARKET WORK BETTER THAN GOVERNMENT AT ACHIEVING SUSTAINABILITY (No)
__________________
Part of the debate include a small written essay. please divide the 275 words for the introduction and cited in order to put it in the written part. You can divide the 275 into two parts : a written part cited and the speech part. This question plays in canada and should be according to canada’s government etc.

Below I have found some information that may help or contribute please take a look and do cite.
thanks
Stone, Steven J., and Emil J. Dzuray. “Achieving Environmental Sustainability in Government Operations.” Public Manager 34.4 (2006): 22-6. ProQuest. Web. 19 June 2016.

https://www.ec.gc.ca/dd-sd/default.asp lang=En&n=892FBDA6-1 – Planning for a Sustainable Future: A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada 2013–2016
——————-
Intro:
In the 21st century, the world faces tremendous challenges, including economic crises, global warming, air pollution, poverty, poor health, and loss of biodiversity. For more than two decades, sustainable development has been advanced as a means of reconciling human development with the earth’s ecological systems. The journey toward truly sustainable development and decision-making has become a key goal of public policy in Canada and around the world. Development that is not sustainable will inevitably lead to negative economic, environmental, and social repercussions. Advancing sustainable development is about safeguarding our future and improving the quality of life in Canada and for the global community.
Environmental decision-making in Canada takes place in a complex array of jurisdictions, with multiple social and economic priorities, differing stakeholder interests, complex scientific knowledge, international considerations, and priorities of Canadians.
Canada is a country of vast distances and a dispersed population, an economy driven by production and export of natural resources, a northern climate, and of high population growth. The Canadian economy is highly dependent on the health and sustainability of our natural resource industries (renewable and non-renewable), and the reliability of our critical infrastructure, including transportation and health care systems.
——————-
The role of government in building the sustainable economy includes:
Funding basic science needed for renewable energy and renewable resource technology.
Using the tax system, government purchasing power and other financial tools to steer private capital toward investment in renewable energy and other sustainability technologies and businesses.
Investment in sustainability infrastructure, such as smart grids, electric vehicle charging stations, mass transit, waste management facilities, water filtration systems and sewage treatment systems.
Regulating land use and other private behaviors to minimize destruction of ecosystems.
Working with private organizations as well as state and local government to ensure that the transition is well-managed in the real world.
Measuring our society’s progress toward sustainability by developing and maintaining a system of generally accepted sustainability metrics. This in turn should facilitate the integration of sustainability into our overall management of the economy along with the setting of national sustainable economic policy.
Transferring sustainability technologies to the developing world.