drama RULES

PICK a play ( from Moliere, Misanthrope; Aphra Behn, The Rover ;Gilbert & Sullivan, Mikado;Hamlet; Shakespeare, Othello ;Midsummer Night’s Dream; Shakespeare in Love;Calderon, Life is a Dream;Marlowe, Dr. Faustus ) to review. Write three, numbered paragraphs, following the instructions below. (Roughly, 200-500 words total.)
The earlier the report is posted, the better. Read all reports. The first reporter has the privilege of choosing the play (when there is a choice), or selecting one character within the same play. No report should duplicate another! So we may see reports on secondary plays and characters here, which it will be useful to read.

–If you want to report on an external play, ask first–and link the pages or internet text of the play in your report.
Summarize the story of your play clearly!– Emphasize the main stages of the plot, and include important characters, actions, and elements of the scenery.
Use complete sentences and fill out paragraphs to identify topics and to add support or significance.
THREE PARAGRAPHS (or sections) by number:

Trace or summarize the key stages or elements of the plot of one play (with appropriate illustrations from the story).
Analyze ONE main character in that play (describing purpose, problems, and details).
Explain the theme (or purpose) of the plot (with a convincing explanation of your hypothesis, offering support from the story).
You may well need to make some discovery and technical learning in these early reports, which is what they are for. Here are key terms and techniques suitable for these reports:

To illustrate (a category or generalization) is to give an example of what you are talking about.: to illustrate on-line classes, for example, take Intro. to Drama; then describe how it is organized, what is being read in that course, and what work is being assigned. Details fill in the illustration.
To summarize is to collect the key elements of your essay or character or play together, in an organized paragraph, usually beginning or ending with a topic statement. The topic subject is ‘what it’s all about.’ A thesis statement (or issue question) is ‘what is the point of this material?’
A plot is the sequence of events within a story or play, perhaps directly involving one main actor who does these things and/or responds to them. The shape of the plot may be ascending (tending toward a happy ending), descending (tending toward an unhappy ending), or mixed (following positive events with negative ones — as in a tragedy; or following negative events with positive ones — as in epic romance).
A play usually has one main plot (with key actions, and main characters), but may have sub-plots that are shorter than or parallel to the main story (involving lesser actions, themes and/or characters), which are worth noticing.
The key thematic focus that I would like you to keep in mind is the moral agency of a particular character in the plot, which means his responsibility for his actions and re-actions, including the final positive or negative outcome of the plot of the whole play. Does this character show development (growth) or decay?

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drama RULES

PICK a play ( from Moliere, Misanthrope; Aphra Behn, The Rover ;Gilbert & Sullivan, Mikado;Hamlet; Shakespeare, Othello ;Midsummer Night’s Dream; Shakespeare in Love;Calderon, Life is a Dream;Marlowe, Dr. Faustus ) to review. Write three, numbered paragraphs, following the instructions below. (Roughly, 200-500 words total.)
The earlier the report is posted, the better. Read all reports. The first reporter has the privilege of choosing the play (when there is a choice), or selecting one character within the same play. No report should duplicate another! So we may see reports on secondary plays and characters here, which it will be useful to read.

–If you want to report on an external play, ask first–and link the pages or internet text of the play in your report.
Summarize the story of your play clearly!– Emphasize the main stages of the plot, and include important characters, actions, and elements of the scenery.
Use complete sentences and fill out paragraphs to identify topics and to add support or significance.
THREE PARAGRAPHS (or sections) by number:

Trace or summarize the key stages or elements of the plot of one play (with appropriate illustrations from the story).
Analyze ONE main character in that play (describing purpose, problems, and details).
Explain the theme (or purpose) of the plot (with a convincing explanation of your hypothesis, offering support from the story).
You may well need to make some discovery and technical learning in these early reports, which is what they are for. Here are key terms and techniques suitable for these reports:

To illustrate (a category or generalization) is to give an example of what you are talking about.: to illustrate on-line classes, for example, take Intro. to Drama; then describe how it is organized, what is being read in that course, and what work is being assigned. Details fill in the illustration.
To summarize is to collect the key elements of your essay or character or play together, in an organized paragraph, usually beginning or ending with a topic statement. The topic subject is ‘what it’s all about.’ A thesis statement (or issue question) is ‘what is the point of this material?’
A plot is the sequence of events within a story or play, perhaps directly involving one main actor who does these things and/or responds to them. The shape of the plot may be ascending (tending toward a happy ending), descending (tending toward an unhappy ending), or mixed (following positive events with negative ones — as in a tragedy; or following negative events with positive ones — as in epic romance).
A play usually has one main plot (with key actions, and main characters), but may have sub-plots that are shorter than or parallel to the main story (involving lesser actions, themes and/or characters), which are worth noticing.
The key thematic focus that I would like you to keep in mind is the moral agency of a particular character in the plot, which means his responsibility for his actions and re-actions, including the final positive or negative outcome of the plot of the whole play. Does this character show development (growth) or decay?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *