1) There are several barriers to effective listening discussed in your textbook, including weasel words, euphemisms, jargon, and gobbledygook. Summarize what each of these fallacies are. 2) Go on YouTube or Google and search for infomercials. Infomercials are a form of paid programming that masks itself as informative but is actually designed to persuade consumers to purchase a particular product. These products often bear the label “as seen on TV.” For example, The Sham Wow was marketed successfully in an infomercial in the 2000s. 3) Watch at least one infomercial and identify at least two times weasel words are used in the commercial. Explain what the words are and what is omitted. Discuss the information that would need to be included to avoid each weasel word. 4) Find one example of a euphemism, jargon, or gobbledygook. Explain the example and why you think it falls into one of these categories. Discuss how this element could be improved so it is no longer a listening fallacy.

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1) There are several barriers to effective listening discussed in your textbook, including weasel words, euphemisms, jargon, and gobbledygook. Summarize what each of these fallacies are. 2) Go on YouTube or Google and search for infomercials. Infomercials are a form of paid programming that masks itself as informative but is actually designed to persuade consumers to purchase a particular product. These products often bear the label “as seen on TV.” For example, The Sham Wow was marketed successfully in an infomercial in the 2000s. 3) Watch at least one infomercial and identify at least two times weasel words are used in the commercial. Explain what the words are and what is omitted. Discuss the information that would need to be included to avoid each weasel word. 4) Find one example of a euphemism, jargon, or gobbledygook. Explain the example and why you think it falls into one of these categories. Discuss how this element could be improved so it is no longer a listening fallacy.

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