2ND ESSAY CASE STUDY

 

Watch the film Little Fish, and using Tracy’s struggling with alcohol and substance abuse. Note down all relevant details about the character and her abuse of alcohol or substances, as though conducting an assessment.

Write a brief summary of the selected character and their situation as demonstrated in the film (no more than 300 words).

Using case conceptualization skills, develop an assessment of the character’s history, personality, family, social and cultural contexts, occupation and employment, current level of substance abuse, symptoms and impacts.

Next, plan a treatment approach that takes into account the severity of substance abuse, anticipated withdrawal symptoms and client preference for treatment (if known).

Identify the counselling modality most likely to be effective and provide a rationale and evidence for its effectiveness. (Whatever you use because you can mix approaches, integrate ABC model, from Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy [CBT] to work with Tracy)

Describe the counselling relationship that would develop, given what is known of the character and his/her situation.

Develop a relapse prevention plan.

 

The case study will need to address:

  • Summary of the Tracy’s situation provided (no more than 300 words)
  • Applied case conceptualization demonstrated including assessment of the character’s history, personality, family, social and cultural contexts, occupation and employment, current level of substance abuse, symptoms and impacts

 

  • Treatment approach aligns with severity of substance abuse, anticipated withdrawal symptoms and client preference (if known)
  • Rationale and evidence for effectiveness of selected counselling modality is provided
  • Counselling relationship likely to develop is outlined
  • Clear and logical presentation of ideas
  • Fluent academic writing is used, written in third person
  • Minimum 12 references are used (not older than 15 years)
  • Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation are demonstrated
  • APA referencing style (6th ed.) is followed for in-text referencing and reference list

 

RULES TO WRITE A CASE STUDY

In a case study, you are working with the story of a person and their situation.  The case (story) may be given to you in the assignment question, or you may need to develop your own case scenario. Depending upon the unit topic, the case may be about a client or an organisation.

When writing a case study, you are expected to explain a case using relevant theory to support your ideas.  You need to demonstrate how the theory applies in a practical sense using your case to provide examples. A case study is an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to apply theory to practice.

A case study:

  • should provide a description of a particular subject such as a practice, problem, scenario or situation.
  • is often based on a person or organisation
  • provides an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to apply theory to practice.
  • should critically analyse, evaluate or review the subject using the relevant theory
  • may be given to you in the assignment question, or you may need to develop your own case scenario.

Three key requirements for a case study:

Writing style

As with all academic assignments start with an introduction and finish with a conclusion. Case studies may require you to write in both the third and first person. Use third person (the names of authors, ‘he/she/they’, etc) when discussing the client, organisation or counsellor in the case. Use first person (‘I’) to provide your own reflections about the case, its personal impact upon you, and how this might influence your application of theories, concepts and skills being considered in the unit.

Verbatim examples

Use verbatim examples that exemplify what could be said to the client to support the concept and theory you are discussing.

Headings

Headings should be used in a case study. Format them as follows:

  • Title case (all important words start with a capital letter, but not words like ‘a’, ‘and’, ‘or’)
  • Centred on the page
  • In bold font but not underlined

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 2ND ESSAY CASE STUDY

 

Watch the film Little Fish, and using Tracy’s struggling with alcohol and substance abuse. Note down all relevant details about the character and her abuse of alcohol or substances, as though conducting an assessment.

Write a brief summary of the selected character and their situation as demonstrated in the film (no more than 300 words).

Using case conceptualization skills, develop an assessment of the character’s history, personality, family, social and cultural contexts, occupation and employment, current level of substance abuse, symptoms and impacts.

Next, plan a treatment approach that takes into account the severity of substance abuse, anticipated withdrawal symptoms and client preference for treatment (if known).

Identify the counselling modality most likely to be effective and provide a rationale and evidence for its effectiveness. (Whatever you use because you can mix approaches, integrate ABC model, from Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy [CBT] to work with Tracy)

Describe the counselling relationship that would develop, given what is known of the character and his/her situation.

Develop a relapse prevention plan.

 

The case study will need to address:

  • Summary of the Tracy’s situation provided (no more than 300 words)
  • Applied case conceptualization demonstrated including assessment of the character’s history, personality, family, social and cultural contexts, occupation and employment, current level of substance abuse, symptoms and impacts

 

  • Treatment approach aligns with severity of substance abuse, anticipated withdrawal symptoms and client preference (if known)
  • Rationale and evidence for effectiveness of selected counselling modality is provided
  • Counselling relationship likely to develop is outlined
  • Clear and logical presentation of ideas
  • Fluent academic writing is used, written in third person
  • Minimum 12 references are used (not older than 15 years)
  • Correct grammar, spelling and punctuation are demonstrated
  • APA referencing style (6th ed.) is followed for in-text referencing and reference list

 

RULES TO WRITE A CASE STUDY

In a case study, you are working with the story of a person and their situation.  The case (story) may be given to you in the assignment question, or you may need to develop your own case scenario. Depending upon the unit topic, the case may be about a client or an organisation.

When writing a case study, you are expected to explain a case using relevant theory to support your ideas.  You need to demonstrate how the theory applies in a practical sense using your case to provide examples. A case study is an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to apply theory to practice.

A case study:

  • should provide a description of a particular subject such as a practice, problem, scenario or situation.
  • is often based on a person or organisation
  • provides an opportunity to demonstrate your ability to apply theory to practice.
  • should critically analyse, evaluate or review the subject using the relevant theory
  • may be given to you in the assignment question, or you may need to develop your own case scenario.

Three key requirements for a case study:

Writing style

As with all academic assignments start with an introduction and finish with a conclusion. Case studies may require you to write in both the third and first person. Use third person (the names of authors, ‘he/she/they’, etc) when discussing the client, organisation or counsellor in the case. Use first person (‘I’) to provide your own reflections about the case, its personal impact upon you, and how this might influence your application of theories, concepts and skills being considered in the unit.

Verbatim examples

Use verbatim examples that exemplify what could be said to the client to support the concept and theory you are discussing.

Headings

Headings should be used in a case study. Format them as follows:

  • Title case (all important words start with a capital letter, but not words like ‘a’, ‘and’, ‘or’)
  • Centred on the page
  • In bold font but not underlined

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *