History of Interpretation Paper

 

Lk 13:23-24 is the verse that was chosen

This paper should trace the history of the interpretation of this verse, noting at least four significant interpretations from assigned course readings and two significant interpretation from readings not assigned for this course. Sources used regularly in this course, like the Anchor Bible Commentary and Sacra Pagina, will provide students with ample resources to find theologians not listed on the syllabus.

2. Secondly, what this paper is NOT asking you to do is write 5-7 pages on the context of the verse. In other words, you are not “explaining the hidden meaning of the parable” – you are being asked to show how various theologians (specifically 3 from the ones we’ve read in class and 1 other one) have interpreted the passage you selected and based their theology around it.

3. Below is a sample thesis and text presentation which should give you a good idea of what your papers are intended to discuss. If you have any questions please get with me now while you still have a month to work on these.

Sample thesis and comments:

This paper will provide a brief history of the interpretation of the verse “Jacob I have loved; Esau I have hated.” This verse originally belongs to Malachi 1:1, though Paul repeats it at Rom 9:13-14. It is significant for the puzzles it presents for theologians who attempt to figure out the mysteries of predestination and free will. The paper will consider Origen, St. Augustine, St. Prosper of Aquitaine, and Martin Luther. It will argue that there are two main lines of thought based on whether one accepts universalism or not. Since Origen accepts that all will eventually be saved, he must explain the hate God has for Esau. Since Augustine accepts that some will not be saved, the great mystery for him is that God loves Jacob gratuitously. St. Prosper largely agrees with St. Augustine. Luther stands in the same tradition as Augustine since he studied Augustine’s thought and agrees that some will not be saved, but Luther is concerned to add an argument about certainty and faith to the discussion.

At De Prin 1.1.1 Origen notes the relevant verse and argues, “….” This means…

At Pred. sanct. 2.2.2 Augustine uses the verse to make the point that, “….” This is significant because…

At voc. Omn. Gen. 3.3.3 Prosper does not quote the verse exactly, but he does reference the specific figures and the discussion about salvation.
Prosper writes, “….” Prosper makes the same three points that Augustine did about the verse: 1…2…3…

At Captivity of the Will, Luther uses the verse then argues, “….” Just before using the verse, Luther had been arguing, “…” This is like Augustine and Origen because… However, Luther separates himself from Augustine by using the verse in the context of…

We have seen that Origen…Augustine…Prosper….Luther…

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