Unit 1

  1. What are the three physical states of matter, including that of fuel? Give examples of each. Why is a fuel’s physical state important? How can a change from one state to another affect a fuel?
  2. Briefly describe the five stages of development for a generalized room fire in a room with a normal fuel load. What are the main characteristic features of each stage, and why should a fire investigator know them?

Unit 3

  1. What are burn patterns, and what causes them? Why are burn patterns important when investigating a fire? What do they help an investigator determine about a fire?
  2. What are burn patterns, and what causes them? Why are burn patterns important when investigating a fire? What do they help an investigator determine about a fire?

Unit 4 (300 words)

  1. The two basic forms of electricity are static and current, and the two types of current electricity are alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). Define and summarize these four electrical concepts and what they involve. Provide specific examples of how you would identify static and current electricity and how AC and DC are most commonly delivered.
  2. When investigating fires ignited by electrical means, what should a fire investigator consider? Describe the categories of overheating, conditions that might cause failure, and how each will contribute to the ignition of fire.

Unit 5

  1. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are two highly useful laboratory procedures that can be used in the analysis of evidence gathered in an investigation. Describe both, including the difference between the two forms of analyses. Give examples of when each would be used.
  2. Why was the Flammable Fabrics Act enacted by Congress? What was its purpose? How is it enforced? How is it related to the Consumer Product Safety Act of 1972? Discuss the history of the Flammable Fabrics Act and its subsequent modifications. Provide details of the present-day application of this law and how manufacturers comply with the standards set forth in the act.
  3. Synthetic fibers are found in virtually all forms of clothing worn by humans. Unlike clothing made using natural fibers, these synthetic materials are often less expensive and have greater durability and longevity. Identify and describe at least two of each type of fiber (petroleum- and non-petroleum-based), including their common market names and how each is most likely to react when exposed to flame.

Unit 6

  1. Reactive metals are those that will react, often violently, under certain conditions. One of these conditions is the application of water, which is the most common extinguishing agent used in firefighting. Identify and describe four commonly known reactive metals. Explain how they ignite and describe their behavior when certain extinguishing agents are applied. What dangers does each reactive metal present when ignited?
  2. Ignitable gases are commonly found in many residential, commercial, and industrial settings. Each type of gas has its own ignition temperature and requires a certain mixture with air in order to ignite and maintain combustion. The combination of gas leakage and air, and the amount of space in which this occurs, can result in a diffuse-phase explosion. What happens to cause this? Where will the greatest destruction occur? What are three types of mixture levels, and what does each involve?

Unit 7

  1. Profit is often a motive for arson, and within profit we will often find fraud as the actual crime. What two types of fraud are often involved in fire investigations? Describe them, giving specific details about each, such as clues that might identify it. Using the Internet, find at least one well-publicized case involving each of the two forms of arson. Provide details about the motive in each case, as well as the specific web link associated with each of your findings.
  2. The he victim of a fire-related death is often classified as “burnt beyond recognition,” but identifying the remains is paramount to your investigation. Who would you most likely call to help you determine a fire victim’s identity? What might they discover? What strategies or methods would be used when identifying the remains? What forms of identifying information should be focused on, and what should not be accepted at face value? Why? What might be discovered while trying to identify the remains that would impact the fire investigation?

Unit 8

  1. How are mathematical, zone, and field fire modeling different? How is each type of model used?
  2. What restrictions are placed on public and private sector investigators when collecting evidence at a fire scene? How should evidence be collected and preserved, and what steps should be taken to prevent spoliation? What are the consequences of spoliation?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Unit 1

  1. What are the three physical states of matter, including that of fuel? Give examples of each. Why is a fuel’s physical state important? How can a change from one state to another affect a fuel?
  2. Briefly describe the five stages of development for a generalized room fire in a room with a normal fuel load. What are the main characteristic features of each stage, and why should a fire investigator know them?

Unit 3

  1. What are burn patterns, and what causes them? Why are burn patterns important when investigating a fire? What do they help an investigator determine about a fire?
  2. What are burn patterns, and what causes them? Why are burn patterns important when investigating a fire? What do they help an investigator determine about a fire?

Unit 4 (300 words)

  1. The two basic forms of electricity are static and current, and the two types of current electricity are alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC). Define and summarize these four electrical concepts and what they involve. Provide specific examples of how you would identify static and current electricity and how AC and DC are most commonly delivered.
  2. When investigating fires ignited by electrical means, what should a fire investigator consider? Describe the categories of overheating, conditions that might cause failure, and how each will contribute to the ignition of fire.

Unit 5

  1. Gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are two highly useful laboratory procedures that can be used in the analysis of evidence gathered in an investigation. Describe both, including the difference between the two forms of analyses. Give examples of when each would be used.
  2. Why was the Flammable Fabrics Act enacted by Congress? What was its purpose? How is it enforced? How is it related to the Consumer Product Safety Act of 1972? Discuss the history of the Flammable Fabrics Act and its subsequent modifications. Provide details of the present-day application of this law and how manufacturers comply with the standards set forth in the act.
  3. Synthetic fibers are found in virtually all forms of clothing worn by humans. Unlike clothing made using natural fibers, these synthetic materials are often less expensive and have greater durability and longevity. Identify and describe at least two of each type of fiber (petroleum- and non-petroleum-based), including their common market names and how each is most likely to react when exposed to flame.

Unit 6

  1. Reactive metals are those that will react, often violently, under certain conditions. One of these conditions is the application of water, which is the most common extinguishing agent used in firefighting. Identify and describe four commonly known reactive metals. Explain how they ignite and describe their behavior when certain extinguishing agents are applied. What dangers does each reactive metal present when ignited?
  2. Ignitable gases are commonly found in many residential, commercial, and industrial settings. Each type of gas has its own ignition temperature and requires a certain mixture with air in order to ignite and maintain combustion. The combination of gas leakage and air, and the amount of space in which this occurs, can result in a diffuse-phase explosion. What happens to cause this? Where will the greatest destruction occur? What are three types of mixture levels, and what does each involve?

Unit 7

  1. Profit is often a motive for arson, and within profit we will often find fraud as the actual crime. What two types of fraud are often involved in fire investigations? Describe them, giving specific details about each, such as clues that might identify it. Using the Internet, find at least one well-publicized case involving each of the two forms of arson. Provide details about the motive in each case, as well as the specific web link associated with each of your findings.
  2. The he victim of a fire-related death is often classified as “burnt beyond recognition,” but identifying the remains is paramount to your investigation. Who would you most likely call to help you determine a fire victim’s identity? What might they discover? What strategies or methods would be used when identifying the remains? What forms of identifying information should be focused on, and what should not be accepted at face value? Why? What might be discovered while trying to identify the remains that would impact the fire investigation?

Unit 8

  1. How are mathematical, zone, and field fire modeling different? How is each type of model used?
  2. What restrictions are placed on public and private sector investigators when collecting evidence at a fire scene? How should evidence be collected and preserved, and what steps should be taken to prevent spoliation? What are the consequences of spoliation?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *