Module Code               MPLHS1FCP

 

Parent Programme         Pre-Registration IPL Programme / BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

 

Module Title       Foundations of Occupation

 

Level                    4

 

Credit Rating       20 credits (10 ECTS credits)

& Duration           60 hours academic direction

140 hours of student learning time

 

Academic Responsibility         Sarah Harvey

 

Pre-Requisites     Not applicable

 

Co-Requisites               Not applicable

 

Module Aims

The module aims to provide an understanding of occupation as the foundation knowledge of the occupational therapist.  It will introduce you to the complexity of occupation and its relationship to health and wellbeing.  It aims to begin to develop a sense of identity as an occupational therapist.

 

Learning Outcomes     

By the end of this module you should be able to:

  1. Use appropriate occupation focussed language to explain the importance of occupations on health and wellbeing.
  2. Describe how occupational science concepts inform occupational therapy practice.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of occupational performance analysis as a core tool of occupational therapy practice.

 

Indicative Module Content    

Occupation will be introduced as the unique focus of the occupational therapist. Occupational performance analysis will be used to enhance your understanding of the complexities of occupation. The history of occupational therapy will be presented to outline the development of the profession, which will help to inform your professional identity. Models of occupational therapy and disability (including the World Health Organisations’ International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) will frame occupational therapy in the wider context.

Occupation will be explored through the lens of occupational science in order for you to develop a sense of identity as an occupational therapy student and as an underpinning concept guiding occupational therapy practice. The Person-Environment-Occupation model (Law et al., 1996) will be used as a means for introducing the language of occupational therapy theory. There will be an opportunity to develop some core practical skills which will be of value in the practice setting. The basics of ‘doing’ occupational therapy will be highlighted.

 

Learning and Teaching Strategies

You will be expected to actively engage in classroom activities as an individual and in small and larger group activities. You will need to prepare for taught content as appropriate which includes the completion of workbook activities and further reading. Group presentations will form part of the formative learning process.  You will be encouraged to use their developing skills gained via the personal development module to search for, and use, information gained about occupational therapy etc. and to engage in activity including the virtual learning environment. You will utilise knowledge and understanding when on placement.

 

Indicative Assessment

This module will be assessed through a 2,500 word written assignment in which you should demonstrate an understanding of occupational therapy theory applied to meaningful occupation and occupational performance analysis [weighting 50%]. (LO 1, 2, 3).

 

Assessment of practice – 2500 word equivalent [weighting 50%] (LO 1, 2, 3).

 

Indicative Resources

 

Purchase

Duncan E. (Ed) (2011) Foundations for practice in occupational therapy, (5th Ed). London: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.

 

Essential

Christiansen, CH & Baum, CM (Eds.) (2015) Occupational Therapy.  Performance, Participation and Well-Being,( 4th Ed).New Jersey: Slack Inc.

 

Recommended

Christiansen & Townsend, (2011). Introduction to Occupation: The Art and Science of Living, (2nd Ed) New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Crepeu, Cohn & Schell (Eds.) (2009) Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy (11th Ed)Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins

Kielhofner G (2008) Model of human occupation: Theory and application (4th Ed) Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins

Molineux, M. (2004) Occupation for occupational therapists Oxford: Blackwell Publishers

Pierce, D. (2003) Occupation by design: Building therapeutic power. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Company

Townsend, E.A. & Polatajko, H. J. (2007). Enabling occupation II: Advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well-being & justice through occupation. Ottawa, ON: CAOT ACE

Thomas, H. (2012) Occupation-based activity analysis. New Jersey: Slack Inc.

Pierce.D (2014) Occupational Science for Occupational Therapy, New Jersey: Slack incorporated.

 

 

Journals

Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy

American Journal of Occupational Therapy

British Journal of Occupational Therapy

Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy

Journal of Occupational Science

 

Websites

American Association of Occupational Therapists: www.aota.org

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists: www.caot.org

Royal College of Occupational Therapists, UK: www.cot.org.uk

European Network of Occupational Therapists in Higher Education:

http://enothe.eu

 

 

Health and Care Professions Council: www.hpc-uk.org

World Federation of Occupational Therapists: www.wfot.com/

World Health Organization International Classification of Function, Disability and Health: www.who.int/classifications/icf/en/

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Module Code               MPLHS1FCP

 

Parent Programme         Pre-Registration IPL Programme / BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

 

Module Title       Foundations of Occupation

 

Level                    4

 

Credit Rating       20 credits (10 ECTS credits)

& Duration           60 hours academic direction

140 hours of student learning time

 

Academic Responsibility         Sarah Harvey

 

Pre-Requisites     Not applicable

 

Co-Requisites               Not applicable

 

Module Aims

The module aims to provide an understanding of occupation as the foundation knowledge of the occupational therapist.  It will introduce you to the complexity of occupation and its relationship to health and wellbeing.  It aims to begin to develop a sense of identity as an occupational therapist.

 

Learning Outcomes     

By the end of this module you should be able to:

  1. Use appropriate occupation focussed language to explain the importance of occupations on health and wellbeing.
  2. Describe how occupational science concepts inform occupational therapy practice.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the use of occupational performance analysis as a core tool of occupational therapy practice.

 

Indicative Module Content    

Occupation will be introduced as the unique focus of the occupational therapist. Occupational performance analysis will be used to enhance your understanding of the complexities of occupation. The history of occupational therapy will be presented to outline the development of the profession, which will help to inform your professional identity. Models of occupational therapy and disability (including the World Health Organisations’ International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) will frame occupational therapy in the wider context.

Occupation will be explored through the lens of occupational science in order for you to develop a sense of identity as an occupational therapy student and as an underpinning concept guiding occupational therapy practice. The Person-Environment-Occupation model (Law et al., 1996) will be used as a means for introducing the language of occupational therapy theory. There will be an opportunity to develop some core practical skills which will be of value in the practice setting. The basics of ‘doing’ occupational therapy will be highlighted.

 

Learning and Teaching Strategies

You will be expected to actively engage in classroom activities as an individual and in small and larger group activities. You will need to prepare for taught content as appropriate which includes the completion of workbook activities and further reading. Group presentations will form part of the formative learning process.  You will be encouraged to use their developing skills gained via the personal development module to search for, and use, information gained about occupational therapy etc. and to engage in activity including the virtual learning environment. You will utilise knowledge and understanding when on placement.

 

Indicative Assessment

This module will be assessed through a 2,500 word written assignment in which you should demonstrate an understanding of occupational therapy theory applied to meaningful occupation and occupational performance analysis [weighting 50%]. (LO 1, 2, 3).

 

Assessment of practice – 2500 word equivalent [weighting 50%] (LO 1, 2, 3).

 

Indicative Resources

 

Purchase

Duncan E. (Ed) (2011) Foundations for practice in occupational therapy, (5th Ed). London: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone.

 

Essential

Christiansen, CH & Baum, CM (Eds.) (2015) Occupational Therapy.  Performance, Participation and Well-Being,( 4th Ed).New Jersey: Slack Inc.

 

Recommended

Christiansen & Townsend, (2011). Introduction to Occupation: The Art and Science of Living, (2nd Ed) New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Crepeu, Cohn & Schell (Eds.) (2009) Willard and Spackman’s Occupational Therapy (11th Ed)Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins

Kielhofner G (2008) Model of human occupation: Theory and application (4th Ed) Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins

Molineux, M. (2004) Occupation for occupational therapists Oxford: Blackwell Publishers

Pierce, D. (2003) Occupation by design: Building therapeutic power. Philadelphia: F. A. Davis Company

Townsend, E.A. & Polatajko, H. J. (2007). Enabling occupation II: Advancing an occupational therapy vision for health, well-being & justice through occupation. Ottawa, ON: CAOT ACE

Thomas, H. (2012) Occupation-based activity analysis. New Jersey: Slack Inc.

Pierce.D (2014) Occupational Science for Occupational Therapy, New Jersey: Slack incorporated.

 

 

Journals

Australian Journal of Occupational Therapy

American Journal of Occupational Therapy

British Journal of Occupational Therapy

Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy

Journal of Occupational Science

 

Websites

American Association of Occupational Therapists: www.aota.org

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists: www.caot.org

Royal College of Occupational Therapists, UK: www.cot.org.uk

European Network of Occupational Therapists in Higher Education:

http://enothe.eu

 

 

Health and Care Professions Council: www.hpc-uk.org

World Federation of Occupational Therapists: www.wfot.com/

World Health Organization International Classification of Function, Disability and Health: www.who.int/classifications/icf/en/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *