reflection on the indigenous group you selected during the course (The Maasai).

Order Description
Final Project
Submit an Ethnographic Narrative, which should be 5–6 pages long and include the following:
• A descriptive reflection on the indigenous group you selected during the course (The Maasai). Please include any additional insights about the group’s history/origins, culture, beliefs that you found after Weeks 2 and 3.

• A comparison of the similarities or differences that you found between the indigenous group and your own culture.

• An evaluation of how two of the five role perspectives from Thinking Like an Anthropologist (pp. 8–9) influenced, changed, or reinforced your conception while studying indigenous peoples.

• A description of two or three questions about the indigenous group that you studied that remains unanswered, and that you may pursue in the future.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources.

Required Resources
Readings
• Peters-Golden, H. P. (2012). Culture sketches: Case studies in anthropology (5th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
o Chapter 8, “The Ju/’Hoansi: Reciprocity and Sharing” (pp. 106–125)
o Chapter 9, “The Kaluli: Story, Song, and Ceremony” (pp. 126–144)
o Chapter 11, “The Nuer: Cattle and Kinship in Sudan” (pp. 161–178)
o Chapter 14, “The Samoans: Matai and Migration” (pp. 217–234)
The chapters from this text provide case study analysis of individual groups around the globe.
• Document: Final Project Guidelines (PDF)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

reflection on the indigenous group you selected during the course (The Maasai).

Order Description
Final Project
Submit an Ethnographic Narrative, which should be 5–6 pages long and include the following:
• A descriptive reflection on the indigenous group you selected during the course (The Maasai). Please include any additional insights about the group’s history/origins, culture, beliefs that you found after Weeks 2 and 3.

• A comparison of the similarities or differences that you found between the indigenous group and your own culture.

• An evaluation of how two of the five role perspectives from Thinking Like an Anthropologist (pp. 8–9) influenced, changed, or reinforced your conception while studying indigenous peoples.

• A description of two or three questions about the indigenous group that you studied that remains unanswered, and that you may pursue in the future.

Be sure to support your ideas by connecting them to the week’s Learning Resources.

Required Resources
Readings
• Peters-Golden, H. P. (2012). Culture sketches: Case studies in anthropology (5th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.
o Chapter 8, “The Ju/’Hoansi: Reciprocity and Sharing” (pp. 106–125)
o Chapter 9, “The Kaluli: Story, Song, and Ceremony” (pp. 126–144)
o Chapter 11, “The Nuer: Cattle and Kinship in Sudan” (pp. 161–178)
o Chapter 14, “The Samoans: Matai and Migration” (pp. 217–234)
The chapters from this text provide case study analysis of individual groups around the globe.
• Document: Final Project Guidelines (PDF)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *