Apart from entertainment, videogames have great positive prospective and there has been considerable achievement when videogames are implemented in schools to teach particular skills or address a particular problem. Most reported impacts of videogames to students appear to concentrate on the alleged negative consequences such as increased aggressiveness, addiction, and the psychological and medical effects. However, research carried out in 1980s indicates that playing videogames has benefits to students in school such as enhanced hand-eye coordination, produce a reduction reaction times and raises the self-worth of the player. Therefore, this paper overviews the educational gains to students form the 7th grade and higher because introduction to 6th grade below would lead to addiction.
Why I am interested
I am interested in this topic because evidence from previous researches suggest that student can gain significant skills reinforced by implementation of videogames in school (Cheng, 2012). However, the school administration should be careful so as to introduce these games to students from the 7th grade and above because if introduced to those in 6th grade and below, it can lead to addiction. Students in 7th grade can also balance other obligations such as time for family and education with videogames, hence it is critical to implement to them. Videogame playing can improve the spatial visualization ability and they are also efficient for students who started out with comparatively poor skills.
Readers
The reader of the review is my classmates since they will gain a lot on the importance of videogames as opposed to the much talked about consequences of video games. They will also be able to apply what is in the research to their studies.
References
Cheng, K. (2012). Video game addiction. Neuropsychiatrie De L’enfance Et De L’adolescence, 60(5), S118. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurenf.2012.05.504
JANCIN, B. (2012). Video Game Addiction Real Issue for Many Kids. Family Practice News, 42(4), 50-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0300-7073(12)70203-7

Apart from entertainment, videogames have great positive prospective and there has been considerable achievement when videogames are implemented in schools to teach particular skills or address a particular problem. Most reported impacts of videogames to students appear to concentrate on the alleged negative consequences such as increased aggressiveness, addiction, and the psychological and medical effects. However, research carried out in 1980s indicates that playing videogames has benefits to students in school such as enhanced hand-eye coordination, produce a reduction reaction times and raises the self-worth of the player. Therefore, this paper overviews the educational gains to students form the 7th grade and higher because introduction to 6th grade below would lead to addiction.
Why I am interested
I am interested in this topic because evidence from previous researches suggest that student can gain significant skills reinforced by implementation of videogames in school (Cheng, 2012). However, the school administration should be careful so as to introduce these games to students from the 7th grade and above because if introduced to those in 6th grade and below, it can lead to addiction. Students in 7th grade can also balance other obligations such as time for family and education with videogames, hence it is critical to implement to them. Videogame playing can improve the spatial visualization ability and they are also efficient for students who started out with comparatively poor skills.
Readers
The reader of the review is my classmates since they will gain a lot on the importance of videogames as opposed to the much talked about consequences of video games. They will also be able to apply what is in the research to their studies.
References
Cheng, K. (2012). Video game addiction. Neuropsychiatrie De L’enfance Et De L’adolescence, 60(5), S118. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neurenf.2012.05.504
JANCIN, B. (2012). Video Game Addiction Real Issue for Many Kids. Family Practice News, 42(4), 50-51. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0300-7073(12)70203-7