In English, a predicate is basically everything in the sentence other than the subject.

For example:

I am going to the bank. “I” is the subject, and “the bank” is the object. (Subject is doing the action, object is directly affected by verb).

The predicate is everything in the clause that adds meaning to the subject. So in this instance, the predicate is everything after “I” (“am going to the bank.”).

Here is another example:The green frogs are jumping. The subject in this sentence is “The green frogs”, because that is a specific noun group with a determiner (which in this case is an article – the); and thus the predicate is “are jumping”.

Hope this clears it up for you.

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In English, a predicate is basically everything in the sentence other than the subject.

For example:

I am going to the bank. “I” is the subject, and “the bank” is the object. (Subject is doing the action, object is directly affected by verb).

The predicate is everything in the clause that adds meaning to the subject. So in this instance, the predicate is everything after “I” (“am going to the bank.”).

Here is another example:The green frogs are jumping. The subject in this sentence is “The green frogs”, because that is a specific noun group with a determiner (which in this case is an article – the); and thus the predicate is “are jumping”.

Hope this clears it up for you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *