Observe an ice cube. This is water in a solid form, so it has a high structural order.

Leadership And Trust In Team Collaboration
July 12, 2019
How would you characterize the internal and external equity at Columbus Custom Carpentry? 10 points.
July 12, 2019

Observe an ice cube. This is water in a solid form, so it has a high structural order.

Answer this following question.

1. Observe an ice cube.  This is water in a solid form, so it has a high structural order.  This means that the molecules cannot move very much and are in a fixed position.  The temperature of the ice is zero degrees celcius.  As a result, the entropy of the system is low. 

2. Allow the ice to melt at room temperature.  What is the state of molecules in the liquid water now?  How did the energy transfer take place?  Is the entropy of the system higher or lower?  Why?

3. If you were to heat the melted water to its boiling point, what would happen to the entropy of the system?

4. Describe the structure and complementary base pairing of DNA.

5. Explain how single nucleotide changes can have vastly different effects on protein function.

6. In the past 25 years, we have learned a lot about DNA, and are now able to manipulate genes.  Plants are genetically modified to possess desirable traits such as resistance to disease and to grow with less water and fertilizer.  There are even certain Idaho potatoes that all grow to the same size, so McDonald’s french fries are the same length!  Human genes are inserted into bacteria to inexpensively produce drugs that treat diseases.  Soon, non-life threatening cosmetic changes will be available for those who can afford them.Conduct an internet search to find an interesting example of genetic engineering.  Then, summarize what you discovered.  Next, respond to at least one other student’s findings. 

NLC

NORTH LAKE COLLEGE

5001 N. MacArthur Blvd.

Irving, Texas 75038-3899

DALLAS COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT

Note: Thanks for your interest in the class. After reviewing this syllabus, if you have any concerns or questions e-mail me

(ssharifian@dcccd.edu) and I will be happy to answer them. To access the class after enrolling, go to http://ecampus.dcccd.edu and log in using your seven-digit student ID number as both the username and password to create your ecampus account.

COURSE SYLLABUS

Government 2305

Spring Semester 2018

Liberal Arts Division

Office: A-310 Phone: (972) 273-3480

Call the office for hours of operation

This course syllabus is intended as a set of guidelines for (Course). Both North Lake College and your instructor reserve the right to make modifications in content, schedule, and requirements as necessary to promote the best education possible within prevailing conditions affecting this course.

Instructor Information:

Professor: Sherry Sharifian

Email address: ssharifian@dcccd.edu

Phone Number: 972-860-3954

Room Number: A 370

Office Hours: MW: 7:00 AM-8:00 AM; 9:30 AM- 10:50 AM (A 370) (by appointment)

TR: 7:00 AM-8:00 AM; 11:00 AM- 12:00 AM (North Campus) (by appointment)

Course Information

Course title: Federal Government

Course number: 2305

Section number: TR: 73059 8:00 AM; 73062 9:30 AM Room N 109 (North Campus)

Class meeting time: MW: 73012 12:30 PM Room A 347 (Central Campus)

Credit hours: three

Cert Date: 01/29/2018

Drop Date: 04/12/2018

Course prerequisites:

Prerequisite: College level ready in Reading and Writing.

Course Description: Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights. (To ensure transferability, students should plan to take both GOVT 2305 and 2306 within the DCCCD.) (3 Lec.) Coordinating Board Academic Approval Number 4510025125.

Course required text and materials:

We The People: An Introduction to American Government by  Thomas Patterson  (Author) 12th edition. ISBN9781309094815

Table of Contents

I. Course Method

II. Course Requirements

III. Instructional System

IV. Course Outline

V. Student Learning Outcomes and Course Objectives

VI. Course Schedule (includes Readings, Assignments and Deadlines)

VII. Grading System and Course Evaluation

VIII. DCCCD Institutional Policies

I. Course Method

This course asks you to think critically about the federal American political system. The course aims to not only promote a deeper understanding of American politics but to also enable students to take part more effectively in democratic society. The critical thinking and writing called for in this course are skills valuable to most careers.

II. Course Requirements

To complete this course successfully, you should do the following:

1. Take the Getting Started Orientation Quiz.

2. Take Seventeen (17)quizzes. *

3. Take Four (4)unit exams. *

4. Complete and submit Three (3) analytical writing assignments.

III. Instructional System

Content for this course: This course is contained primarily in the (a) interactive lessons, (b) chapter PowerPoints, and (c) assigned textbook chapters. These materials and your instructor are the most important resources available to you to complete this course successfully.

a. The lessons offer short introductions to the topic, self-assessment questions, mini-documentary videos and interactive exercises.

b. The PowerPoint presentations provide an overview of textbook chapters.

c. The textbook chapter readings offer more in-depth exploration of the subject.

d. The supplementary resources various activities to help you reinforce and retain the content. Use as many or as much as you find helpful.

Lastly, your instructor is here to guide you through the course, explaining procedures you should follow to complete each lesson and chapter, grading assignments, giving feedback on assignments and quizzes, answering your questions about any aspect of the class, etc. Note: you will communicate with me by e-mail (ssharifian@dcccd.edu) and by completing and submitting class work through eCampus (http://ecampus.dcccd.edu). E-mail me when you have questions or need help. That is why I am here—to help you complete the course requirements and be successful in the class. Normally you can expect me to respond to your e-mails 24-48 hours. While this is my general and intended practice, it is subject to changes and life circumstances.

Most of the time you spend on this course will involve the following activities:

1. Take the Getting Started Orientation Quiz after familiarizing yourself with the syllabus and course layout and reading all the items under the not-so-obscurely titled tab, “Getting Started Quiz!”, meant to introduce you to the course and its organization.

2. Using the primary sources to learn the content: (1) reading the textbook, (2) viewing the PowerPoint presentations, and (3) completing the interactive lessons.

3. Using any supplementary resources provided.

4. Taking Seventeen (17) chapter quizzes.

5. Preparing for and taking Four (4) unit exams.

6. Completing and submitting three analytical papers.

IV. Course Outline

In this course, you will learn about the organization, principles and various functions of the federal government. There are 18 interactive lessons that correspond to 17 selected textbook chapters. Quiz and exam questions are from both the textbook chapters and interactive lessons.

Text Book ChaptersInteractive Lessons
01: Political Thinking and Political Culture1-Roots of American Government; 2- American Political Culture
02: Constitutional Democracy3-The US Constitution
03: Federalism: Forging a Nation4-Federalism
04: Civil Liberties14- Civil Liberties
05: Equal Rights15- Civil Rights
06: Public Opinion and Political Socialization9- Public Opinion
07: Political Participation15- Civil Rights
08: Political Parties; Candidates and Campaigns11 Political parties; 10- Campaigns and Elections
09: Interest Groups12- Interest groups
10: The News Media13-Media
11: Congress5-Congress
12: The Presidency6-The Presidency
13: The Federal Bureaucracy7- Bureaucracy
14: The Federal Judicial System8-The Judiciary
15: Economic and Environmental Policy16- Economic Policy
16: Income; Welfare; and Education Policy17- Social Policy
17: Foreign Policy18- Foreign Policy
V. Student Learning Outcomes and Course ObjectivesGOVT 2305 is a Tier 2 course in the Self and Society learning category. “Knowledge and skills learned in Tier 1 are reinforced and applied. The Self and Society category is designed to compare and contrast your knowledge of social behaviors. You will find opportunities to question the roles both you and others play in addressing the issues of our society.” – Catalog of the Colleges of DCCCD

Course description

This course is designed to be an introduction to American government, its historical foundations, institutions and political processes. We will examine how our political system was designed, how it has changed over time and how public opinion, the media and the “information age” have affected our government institutions and public policy. We will discuss the role and scope of government as it was conceived by the Founders and as it is viewed today. Finally, we will examine current policy issues, weigh the costs and benefits of actions and engage in thoughtful discussion of contemporary policies and actions with a view toward how those issues and actions impact the current political scene. To achieve these objectives, I have chosen a textbook that focuses attention on the role of citizens as key actors in the democratic experiment that we call the United States of America

Program Level objectives

Core CompetenciesThis class is designed to help you develop a selection of the following competencies (see items marked with X):
Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.X
Communication Skills: To include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication.X
Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making.X
Social Responsibility: To include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.X

Course-Level objectives for GOVT 2305 Federal Government

Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

1. Explain the origin and development of constitutional democracy in the United States.

2. Demonstrate knowledge of the federal system.

3. Describe separation of powers and checks and balances in both theory and practice.

4. Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government.

5. Evaluate the role of public opinion, interest groups, and political parties in the political system.

6. Analyze the election process.

7. Describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

8. Analyze issues and policies in U.S. politics.

NLC GOVT. 2305 Departmental Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Departmental Student Learning Outcomes——SLOs are assessed via writing assignments found in Unit I-III in the course. SLOs are common assessments required in every GOVT 2305 course at NLC.

1. SLO #1: Civil rights versus Civil Liberties. 70% of students will successfully analyze the nuances between civil liberties and civil rights, as well as how the judicial branch interprets them. By researching the U.S. Supreme Court and selecting a contemporary civil rights and civil liberties decision, the students will be able to evaluate how these decisions impact our society. [SLO #1 fulfills the following Program Level Outcomes: Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well as the following Course Level Outcomes: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8.]

2. SLO #2: Social Media and the USA Presidency. 70% of students will successfully research and evaluate how the office of the President and Vice President uses social media as a platform for their agendas. [SLO #2 fulfills the following Program Level Outcomes: Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well the following Course Level Outcomes: 2, 3,4, 5, 7, 8.]

3. SLO #3: News Media: How (and why) to spot “fake” news. 70% of students will successfully research and evaluate the news media to identify reputable journalism containing more accurate political content. [ SLO #3 fulfills the following Program Level Outcomes: Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well as the following Course Level Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.]

SLO #1: Civil Rights versus Civil LibertiesCourse Level Objectives:2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8Program Level Objectives:1, 2, 3, and 4Assignment One: The Supreme Court: A modern day look into our collective rights.
SLO #2: Social Media and the U.S. A. PresidencyCourse Level Objectives:2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8Program Level Objectives:1, 2, 3, and 4Assignment Two: Evaluating the use of social media in the Executive Branch.
SLO #3: News MediaCourse Level Objectives:1, 2, 3, 4, 5,6, 7 and 8Program Level Objectives:1, 2, 3, and 4Assignment Three: News Media: How to spot “fake” news. Fake news and cognitive bias.

For all assignments, including SLO Assessments, the following general requirements hold:

1. Assignments must be two to three pages in length, typed per MLA formatting requirements. You will find more information regarding these requirements in the ecampus course.

2. Citations of material are required; both in-text citations and works cited page.

3. Assignments must be turned in on ecampus by the deadlines. The deadlines are non-negotiable.

Instructor’s Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism Policy

Throughout this course, you will pursue your studies with integrity and honesty; Plagiarism is the use of another’s work, words, or ideas without attribution. The word “plagiarism” comes from the Latin word for “kidnapper” and is considered a form of theft, a breach of honesty in the academic community. (Yale College Regulations) Plagiarizers suffer serious consequences in North Lake College, [including suspension or expulsion from school.] See the “Institutional policies relating to this course that can be accessed from the following link: www.northlakecollege.edu/syllabipolicies”

For more information, please check this link:

https://ctl.yale.edu/writing/using-sources/understanding-and-avoiding-plagiarism/warning-when-you-must-cite

Plagiarism includes:

· Failure to cite the source accurately: including failure to use quotation marks, in-text citation and bibliographic information. Remember papers are checked for plagiarism, both within the ecampus system as well as the entire World Wide Web!

· Submitting any assignment that you did not write! This includes papers written by you for another class, essays purchased online or in person, written by someone else for financial gain or free, papers written by parents, etc.

· “Sharing” ideas that appear to be replicated in another person’s work. This includes “viewing” someone else’s paper and then using part or all the information in your paper. This is known as collusion and is considered cheating.

If a student is caught cheating or plagiarizing in this class, she/he will be reported to the Dean of the Liberal Arts Department for the first offense and will earn a 0 for the plagiarized assignment! Further cheating will result in an F for the course. All assignments, including SLOs are submitted to Safe Assign a tool that detects plagiarism.

VI. Class Schedule (Course Requirements and Deadlines)

Due DateActivity/AssignmentsPointsTotal Points
January 29, 2018Getting Started Quiz2020
Unit One (Chapters:1-4)Textbook Chapters: 1, 2,3 4; Interactive Lessons:
January 31, 2018Chapter 1/Lessons2040
January 31, 2018Chapter 2/Lesson2060
January 31, 2018Chapter 3/Lesson2080
January 31, 2018Chapter 4/Lesson20100
February 04, 2018Exam 1 (Unit One Exam)200300
February 11, 2018Assignment (Unit One Assignment)40340
Unit Two (Chapters5-9)Chapters 5, 6,7,8, and 9; Interactive Lessons:
February 16, 2018Chapter 5/Lesson20360
February 16, 2018Chapter 6/Lesson20380
February 16, 2018Chapter 7/ Lesson20400
February 16, 2018Chapter 8/Lesson20420
February 16, 2018Chapter 9/Lesson20440
February 18, 2018Exam 2 (Unit Two Exam)200640
March 04, 2018Assignment (Unit Two Assignment)40680
Unit Three (Chapters:10-13)Chapters 10,11,12 and 13 and Interactive Lessons: 5,6,7,8.
March 30, 2018Chapter 10/ Lesson20700
March 30, 2018Chapter 11/ Lesson20720
March 30, 2018Chapter 12/ Lesson20740
March 30, 2018Chapter 13/Lesson20760
April 01, 2018Exam Three (Unit Three Exam)200960
April 15, 2018Assignment (Unit Three Assignment)401000
Unit 4 (Chapters 14-17)DROP DEADLINE:April/12/2018Chapters 14,15,16, 17; Interactive Lessons: 14,15,16,17 and 18
May 06, 2018Chapter 14/Lesson201020
May 06, 2018Chapter 15/Lesson201040
May 06, 2018Chapter 16/Lessons201060
May 06, 2018Chapter 17/Lesson201080
May 07-10, 2018Final Exam (Unit Four Exam)2001280
Participation and AttendanceJanuary 01- May 10, 20181001380

*Note: Questions on the quizzes and exams come from both the Textbook Chapters and Interactive Lessons.

VII. Grading System and Course Evaluation

The grading scale is based on a point system. There are a total of 1380 points possible in this class. Grades are based on the following point distribution. Your final grades are based on points earned.

Grading Scale
Points RequiredLetter Grade
1320-1380A
1110-1319B
970-1109C
830-969D
0-829F

Note: Grades will not be “adjusted” favorably (or unfavorably) for students who are close to the cut-off between grades.

The distribution and accumulation of points is illustrated in the evaluation scale below.

Evaluation Scale

Required Points
Getting Started Quiz1 at 20 points20 Points
Attendance and Participation100 points100 Points
Assignments3 at 40 Points each120 points
Chapter/Lessons Quizzes17 at 20 points each340 points
Exams4 at 200 points each800 points

Means of Assessment Of course Learning Outcomes:

Assessment of student performance for this course will be based on the following:

1. Exams

Each unit is accompanied by an exam. Exams are not cumulative; they only cover the chapters assigned for that particular unit, not material from past chapters. Each exam consists of 50 multiple-choice questions and is worth 200 points. Exams are timed; you have two hours (120 minutes) to complete the exam. There are no make-up exams. If a technical issue occurs while you are taking an exam, contact your instructor at once. It is your responsibility to make sure that you have a secure Internet connection before attempting any exam in the class. You can access Exams by selecting the Lessons/Assignments tab from the GOVT 2305 Course Menu in eCampus

4 exams (50 multiple choice questions each 200 points =800 points).

2. Quizzes

Quizzes are designed to measure your comprehension of the online material. There is a quiz for each chapter. Each quiz is worth 20 points and has 20 multiple-choice questions. You are allowed two attempts for each quiz, with your highest score being recorded for your grade. You can access quizzes by selecting the Lessons/Assignments tab from the GOVT 2305 Course Menu in eCampus. 17 Chapter quizzes (20 multiple-choice questions worth 20 points for each chapter= 340 points).

3. Writing Assignments: Analytical Papers (120 points) 3. Writing Assignments: Analytical Papers (120 points)

3@ 40 points each = 120 points in addition to the quizzes, discussion boards, and tests, you must complete three assignments. For each assignment, you must prepare a two to three-page paper responding to specific question. It should be evidence-based, using scholarly sources, and reflect direct, well-organized answers to the questions. Quality is more important than quantity. Important: • The Assignments tab on the GOVT 2305 Course Menu in eCampus lists the topics for each assignment. It also includes guidelines for submitting your papers. • I will use the Assignment Grading Rubric to assess the quality of your work. Review the rubric by selecting the Course Information tab from the GOVT 2305 Course Menu in eCampus. Warning: Academic dishonesty is a very serious matter and will not be tolerated in this class. In all writing assignments, any quotations used must be in quotation marks and the source cited. Close paraphrasing of others’ ideas should also be appropriately cited. Use SafeAssign to check your work for plagiarism before submitting it. Any plagiarized paper, which includes work that is not your own and that does not properly identify quotes, will receive a grade of zero. For all Assessments, the following general requirements hold:

 Be two to three (2-3) pages of content (excluding Works Cited, endnotes, or bibliography pages).

 Use at least three (3) academic resources (e.g. journal article, government web site, online newspaper, etc.) to support your position.

 Conform to MLA style when citing sources and composing your Works Cited page.

This paper provides an opportunity for you to take advantage of the excellent services provided by Northlake College’s Writing Lab. See the eCampus “Writing Resources” tab in the course Information section for links to this, and other resources, you may find it helpful in writing your papers.

To facilitate grading, all writing assignments must comply with the following guidelines :

 Papers must be completed as a Word document, using one-inch margins, double spacing, and size 12 Times Roman or Arial font.

 Include the following,

Papers deviating from these guidelines will be docked 10 points (or more if they radically depart from these guidelines). Writing a paper demands/requires careful thought, writing, and editing on your part. Lean, muscular prose will be highly prized. Rambling, pointless sentences will be penalized. Cardinal grammatical (subject verb disagreement, sentence fragments, etc.) and spelling errors will be docked three (3) points each. A simple use of spell and grammar check, a process taking mere minutes, will save you many points.

Change of Personal Information

If your personal information (name, e-mail address, telephone number, and/or mailing address) changes, notify your instructor and the Admissions/Registrar’s Office immediately to be certain that you receive all necessary information. This is important!

Intellectual Property Policy

All course materials created by the professor remain the intellectual property of the professor and any use of these materials other than for educational purposes by students currently registered in this class may be a violation of copyright laws.

Retrieving Your Final Grade and eConnect

Grade reports are no longer mailed, and telephone grades are unavailable. Convenient access is available online through eConnect. Use your 7-digit student identification number to log in.

To check your grades online:

1. Go to the eConnect main menu and select “Current Credit Students Menu.”

2. Select Log In. Log in using your 7-digit student identification number.

3. Select “Check My Grades (GPA)” under “My Personal Information.”

4. Select the grade type you wish to review and press the submit button. All Grades for the selected grade type will be displayed.

Note: For more information about eConnect, go to https://econnect.dcccd.edu/CreditStudentMenu.jsp. Web site address for eConnect is https://eConnect.dcccd.edu.

Caveat

This syllabus is a set of guidelines for GOVT 2305, Federal Government. The instructor reserves the right to modify any course requirements and due dates as necessary to manage and conduct this class. The intent of the instructor is to promote the best education possible within prevailing conditions affecting this class. Students are responsible for contacting the instructor and seeking clarification of any requirement that is not understood.

MAKEUP AND LATE WORK

The scheduled dates of all exams and written assignments are clearly indicated in this syllabus. It is in each student’s best interest to submit work in a timely fashion. Occasionally, however, life prevents one from keeping deadlines. While the preference is that you submit work on time, you will be expected to complete assignments for each unit no later than the given due date. If you are unable to complete and submit work by the deadline, you are responsible for communicating with the instructor in writing via email. The instructor will determine if work will be accepted. In such cases, please note that points will be deducted for late work and your grade will be lowered at least one letter grade. This means that the highest grade received will be a “B” for assignments/exams submitted late

Incompletes

An incomplete grade of “I” may be given when an unforeseen emergency prevents you from completing the work for this class. Make contact with the instructor immediately if there is a situation preventing you finishing the course. This must occur before the course officially ends. As a rule of thumb, a student must have already completed at least 70 percent of the work in a course in order to be eligible for an incomplete. Ultimately, the course instructor and the division dean determine every decision concerning whether or not to grant an incomplete jointly

PROBLEMS AND EMERGENCIES: If a medical or other serious situation arises that will prevent you from completing one or more assignments or a test by the due date, follow the procedures listed in the table.

For all work except testsContact me immediately to request approval to submitan assignment late.
TestsProvide written documentation of the emergency that will cause you (or did cause you) to miss a test due date before make-up arrangements will be made.Warning: Technical problems occurring during the last hour before a test is due do not count as an emergency. Start tests well before the time they must be submitted.

Communication

Email is the primary means of communication for this class. You are responsible for ensuring that your email address is correctly listed in the course (check this on the first day) and that you are receiving emails from me. To ensure you receive all notices from me in a timely manner, check your email frequently (at least 1-2 times every day).

Make sure you follow this format when sending me an email:

Subject line· The purpose of the email.· Course ID (GOVT. 2305 **Insert Section #**)· Your first and last name· Examples· —Question about Test-GOVT 2305 -71432-Chris Garza· —-Assignment 1 GOVT 2305-71432-Chris Garza· —–Family Emergency GOVT 2305-71432-Chris Garza
Body of email message· The body (message) must ALSO contain the course ID.· Your first and last name at the end of the message.· Important: Emails sent without this format will either receive no reply or a reply telling the student to re-send in proper format, which slows down response time.

If you send me an email that requires a rapid response in order to meet a deadline, make sure you follow the above format. Check your email inbox frequently between the time you sent your email and the due date. Extensions will not be granted in situations where I responded to your email before the due date, but you did not check frequently enough to see the response.

Important:

· Check to make sure your junk mail or bulk mail filters do not delete or reroute email messages sent from the college or from your instructor.

· Make sure your e-mailbox is cleaned out regularly. This is especially important if you have Hotmail or Yahoo accounts. When your mailbox is full, all incoming email messages are rejected.

I will reply to all emails sent in the proper format within 24 hours, so re-send your email if you do Not hear back from me within this time frame. Do not assume that an unanswered email was received—ALWAYS RE-SEND if you do not receive a reply in 24 hours!

Learning Activities, Outcomes, and Assessment

Learning ActivityProvide a brief description of the learning activity.Learning OutcomesBriefly list the specific learning outcomes/ objectives for the activity.AssessmentHow will the activity be assessed?Program and Course Level Student Learning Outcomes (PLO, CLO)Which are addressed by the learning activity?
1. Writing Assignments (3)Students will be able to fully comprehend issues of completion of 3 written assignments.Students are graded on their ability to complete three written assignments employing online sources. Subjects support/ put emphasis on topics discussed during the semester. (40 pts each)CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8PLO 1.1, 1.3, 2, 5
2. Exams and QuizzesChapter Quizzes (17) and Exams (4) that will cover all aspects of the course content.Students will be able to synthesize concepts from readings and materials via multiple choice questionsExams: Objective multiple-choice questions, each worth 200 points.Chapter Quizzes: Objective multiple-Choice questions, each worth 20 pointsSLO 1,2,3,4,5PLO 1.1, 1.4, 2, 5
3. Discussion board debatesStudents will form opinions and respond to their classmates’ posts on controversial issues in U.S. politics.Students must form an initial post and respond to one other student post.CLO 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8PLO 1.1, 2, 4, 5, 6

GOVT2305:

Course Level General Education Outcomes

Learning ActivityProvide a brief description of the learning activity.AssessmentHow will the activity be assessed?Program & Course-Level OutcomesWhich are addressed by the learning activity?
1. Civil Rights Versus Civil LibertiesSLO#1: Civil Rights versus Civil Liberties. 70% of students will successfully analyze the nuances between civil liberties and civil rights, as well as how the judicial branch interprets them.2.By researching the U.S. Supreme Court and selecting a contemporary civil rights and civil liberties decision, the students will be able to evaluate how these decisions impact our society.Program Level OutcomesSLO #1 fulfills the following Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well as the following Course Level Outcomes: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8.]
3. Social Media and the U.S.A. PresidencySLO #2: Social Media and the USA Presidency. 70% of students will successfully research and evaluate how the office of the President and Vice President uses social media as a platform for their agendas.,4.Students will research and evaluate how the office of the President and Vice President uses social media as a platform for their agendas.SLO #2 fulfills the following Program Level Outcomes: Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well as the following Course Level Outcomes: 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8.]
4. How to spot “fake” NewsSLO #3: News Media: How (and why) to spot “fake” news. 70% of students will successfully research and evaluate the news media in an effort to identify reputable journalism containing more accurate political content. Students will also evaluate the impact of “fake” news on the practice of our democracy.Students will evaluate the news media in an effort to identify reputable journalism containing more accurate political content in addition they will also evaluate the impact of “fake news on the practice of our democracySLO #3 fulfills the following Program Level Outcomes: Communication, Critical Thinking, Social and Personal Responsibility, as well as the following Course Level Outcomes: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.]

Learning Outcomes

GOVT 2305 Federal Government (3 Credit Hours) TCCNS: GOVT 2305 / Federal Government 2014 Core Curriculum Foundational Component Area: 070 Government/Political Science Course Description: Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights. (3 Lec.)

Coordinating Board Academic Approval Number 4510025125.

Student Learning Outcomes for GOVT 2305 – Upon successful completion of this course, students will:

Course Level Outcomes

1. Explain the origin and development of constitutional democracy in the United States.

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the federal system.

1. Describe separation of powers and checks and balances in both theory and practice.

1. Demonstrate knowledge of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of the federal government.

1. Evaluate the role of public opinion, interest groups, and political parties in the political system.

1. Analyze the election process.

1. Describe the rights and responsibilities of citizens

1. Analyze issues and policies in U.S. politics.

Program Level Outcomes

Effective Fall 2104;

Program-Level Outcome 1: Communication Skills – to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication

1. Written: Process and produce effective written communication adapted to audience, purpose, and time constraints.

2. Oral: Produce effective oral communication adapted to audience, purpose, and time constraints.

3. Visual: Effectively interpret visual images or produce effective visual images.

4. Listening: Comprehend, and analyze oral information.

Program-Level Outcome 2: Critical Thinking Skills – to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information

Program-Level Outcome 3: Empirical and Quantitative Skills – to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions

Program-Level Outcome 4: Teamwork – to include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal

Program-Level Outcome 5: Personal Responsibility – to include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making

Program-Level Outcome 6: Social Responsibility – to include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities

DCCCD OIE Faculty Syllabi Statement- Spring 2017

The Office of Institutional Equity, in coordination with DCCCD colleges, has the primary responsibility for reviewing, updating and implementing compliance policies and procedures. The Institutional Equity and Compliance Officer and the Office of Institutional Equity will ensure compliance with College District policies, federal and state laws related to sexual assault, Title IX, Title II (Americans with Disabilities Act) and the Military Veterans Full Employment Act to support diversity and inclusion.

Students with Disabilities: If you are a student with a disability and/or special needs, or if you think you may have a disability, please contact the college Disability Services Office (DSO). Please note that all communication with DSO is confidential. If you are eligible for accommodations, please provide or request that the DSO send your accommodation letter to me as soon as possible (students are encouraged to contact DSO at the beginning of the semester). For more information regarding the College Disability Services Office, please visit the Student Services website: dcccd.edu/DSO Offices or contact DCCCD Office of Institutional Equity at (214) 378-1633.

College Disability Services Offices

Brookhaven 972-860-4673

Cedar Valley 972-860-8119

Eastfield 972-860-8348

El Centro 214-860-2411

Mountain View 214-860-8677

North Lake 972-273-3165

Richland 972-238-6180

A Note on Harassment, Discrimination and Sexual Misconduct

We are committed to assure all community members learn and work in a welcoming and inclusive environment. Title VII, Title IX and DCCCD policy prohibit harassment, discrimination and sexual misconduct. If you encounter harassment, sexual misconduct (sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, relationship violence, stalking), retaliation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, age, national origin, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or gender expression, please contact your College Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Institutional Equity. We treat this information with the greatest degree of confidentiality possible while also ensuring student welfare and college safety.

We are concerned about the well-being and development of our students, and are available to discuss any concerns. There are both confidential and non-confidential resources and reporting options available to you. If students wish to keep the information confidential, please contact the college Counseling or Student Health Services. As required by DCCCD policy, incidents of discrimination and/or sexual misconduct shared with faculty will be reported to the College Title IX Coordinator or District Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator will contact the student and determine if further investigation is needed. For more information about policies, resources or reporting options, please contact your college Title IX Coordinator or visit www.dcccd.edu/titleIX.

College Title IX Coordinators

Brookhaven Terri Edrich TitleIX-BHC@dcccd.edu 972-860-4825

Cedar Valley Grenna Rollings TitleIX-CVC@dcccd.edu 972-860-8181

Eastfield Rachel Wolf TitleIX-EFC@dcccd.edu 972-860-7358

El Centro Shanee’ Moore TitleIX-ECC@dcccd.edu 214-860-2138

Mountain View Regina Garner TitleIX-MVC@dcccd.edu 214-860-8561

North Lake Rosemary Meredith(acting) TitleIX-NLC@dcccd.edu 972-860-3992

Richland Bill Dial TitleIX-RLC@dcccd.edu 972-238-6386

Dallas Colleges Online Le’Kendra Higgs TitleIX-LEC@dcccd.edu 972-669-6672

District Title IX Coordinator Office LaShawn Grant TitleIX District@dcccd.edu 214-378-1633

of Institutional Equity

VIII. DCCCD Institutional Policies

North Lake College and Dallas Colleges Online

“Institutional Policies relating to this course can be accessed from the following link:

www.northlakecollege.edu/syllabipolicies

GOVT.2305- Spring Semester 2018-19- Professor Sharifian- North Lake College 7

 

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